Five-Year Sustainability Goals

In 2020, we focused on benchmarking assessments and finalizing organization-wide and division-level targets for the goals. Now that targets have been finalized, we will begin to report on performance in future reports.

Sustainable Development Goals

The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) consist of 17 ambitious targets to address global issues and to ensure a sustainable and resilient future for the world by 2030. The success of the SDGs depends on the participation of a range of actors – governments, corporations, communities and non-governmental organizations.

Our Role to Play

The nature of the work of the natural resources sector has social, economic and environmental impacts on the jurisdictions where projects and operations are located. As a responsible company, Sherritt mitigates and, where possible, avoids negative impacts. Sherritt also makes positive contributions to its host communities at both the national and local level. Highlighting how our operations and end products contribute to the SDGs is important, along with taking responsibility for and acknowledging the impacts of our activities on the broader development agenda. (To better understand the sustainability issues and challenges most material to Sherritt, please review our materiality analysis.)

Our Priorities

We believe that, as a Canadian company operating internationally, we can contribute to and advance relevant Sustainable Development Goals. To understand where Sherritt could have the greatest positive impact, we compared our material sustainability issues with the SDGs, and prioritized the SDGs that we felt we could best support. There is a clear linkage between these SDGs and our five-year sustainability goals.

The chart below displays our Five-Year Sustainability Goals, along with our newly set targets, our performance against the goals in 2020, and some examples of how our activities align with specific SDG targets:

Sustainability Goals Sustainability Targets 2020 Highlights SDGs

Goal 1. Achieve Level A requirements in Towards Sustainable Mining protocols across all operations.

Goal 1
Focus Area Targets

TSM

  • All operations independently verified to have achieved Level A in TSM protocols by 2024

ISO

  • Fort Site: ISO 45001 (occupational health and safety) and ISO 14001 (environmental management systems) certified by 2023
  • Moa Nickel: ISO 45001 and ISO 14001 certified by 2025

Process Safety

  • Fort Site independently verified to full conformance with CSA-Z767-17 (process safety management) by 2025
  • Energas sites conformant with Cuban Resolution 148 by 2025

Other

  • Year-over-year improvement in analyst environmental, social and governance (ESG) ratings

The external verification of the Fort Site’s TSM self-assessments was planned in 2020 and completed in early 2021.

All other sites updated their self-assessments against TSM protocols and continued implementing plans to improve scores from baseline levels.

The Fort Site completed a gap analysis against the CSA Z767-17 standard and developed a multi-year implementation plan.

COVID-19 restrictions delayed ISO and process safety management system implementation plans.

SDG 8.8 – In 2020, all sites completed gap analyses against management system standards to promote safe and secure working environments for all workers and contractors.

Goal 2. Strengthen safety culture, behaviour and performance.

Goal 2
Focus Area Targets

Leading Indicators

  • Achieve an interdependent safety culture by 2030
  • Independent validation of the implementation of Sherritt fatality prevention standards (FPSs) and visible felt leadership programs by 2024

Lagging Indicators

  • Zero fatalities
  • TRIFR, LTIFR and AIFR < three-year average: TRIFR < 0.31, LTIFR < 0.15, AIFR < 2.68 by 2024

Management Systems

  • All operations independently verified to have achieved Level A in TSM Safety & Health Protocol by 2024
  • Fort Site: ISO 45001 certified by 2023
  • Moa Nickel: ISO 45001 certified by 2025

TRIFR: Total Recordable Incident Frequency Rate

LTIFR: Lost Time Incident Frequency Rate

AIFR: All Injury Frequency Rate

All sites continued to implement the FPSs with a focus on heavy and light vehicles, hazardous materials, and machine guarding.

A planned independent safety culture audit was postponed due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Zero fatalities in 2020.

Year-end TRIFR = 0.22, LTIFR = 0.12, AIFR = 1.44.

For more information on site health and safety performance in 2020, click here.

SDG 3.4 – Wellness and mental health benefits were extended to employees during the lockdown and essential work phases of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Goal 3. Improve environmental management.

Goal 3
Focus Area Targets

Incidents

  • Zero significant environmental incidents (as defined by Sherritt’s KPI standard)

Climate and Energy

  • Achieve net zero GHG emissions by 2050
  • Reduce overall GHG emissions intensity by 10% by 2030
  • Obtain 15% of overall energy from renewable sources by 2030
  • All operations independently verified to have achieved Level A in TSM Climate Change Protocol by 2024
  • Implement a climate plan that includes risk and opportunity assessments, and mitigation, adaptation, innovation and communication measures

Air Emissions

  • Reduce NOx emissions intensity by 10% by 2024
  • Reduce H2S point emissions intensity by 5% by 2024

Water

  • Increase water reuse/recycling by 5% by 2024
  • All operations independently verified to have achieved Level A in TSM Water Stewardship Protocol by 2024

Tailings

  • Moa Nickel independently verified to have achieved Level A in TSM Tailings Management Protocol by 2024

NOx: Nitrous oxide

H2S: Hydrogen sulphide

One significant environmental incident in 2020.

A climate plan was developed by management and endorsed by the Board of Directors.

All operations developed business plans to improve environmental performance, including measures to reduce fugitive emissions.

Moa Nickel continued to implement the TSM Tailings Management Protocol to achieve a self-assessed Level B. Management continues to action the recommendations issued by the Independent Tailings Review Board.

For more information on site air emissions and water-related performance in 2020, click here.

For more information on tailings management performance in 2020 click here.

SDG 7.2 – An initiative was launched in 2020 to increase use of renewable energy at the Moa Nickel Site. This initiative includes the acquisition of electric light vehicles. To date, two electric vans have been delivered and two more electric vans are expected in 2021.

SDG 13.2 – Sherritt developed a climate plan and has committed to achieve net zero GHG emissions by 2050.

Goal 4. Create community benefit footprints that support local priorities and the SDGs.

Goal 4
Focus Area Targets

Incidents

  • Zero fatalities involving members of the community
  • Zero significant environmental incidents impacting the community

Community Investment

  • 100% of community investments aligned with local priorities by 2024

Indigenous Relations

  • Fort Site independently verified to have achieved Level A in TSM Indigenous and Community Relationships Protocol by 2024

Zero fatalities involving members of the community.

Zero significant environmental incidents impacting the community.

100% of community investments in Cuba were aligned with local priorities. Donations in-kind consisted of LED lamps, refrigeration equipment for educational and public health centres, road maintenance equipment, air conditioning equipment, and equipment to increase potable water supply.

SDG 3.6 – Sherritt continued to support road safety programs delivered in partnership with UNICEF.

SDG 6.1 – The Moa Nickel Site has a water treatment plant that provides safe drinking water for employees at the plant. A program is in place that enables employees to fill containers of potable water to take home to their families.

SDG 6.A – Sherritt has provided water pumps and pipe cleaning equipment to municipalities in Cuba. The equipment increases the communities’ capacity to provide water and sanitation services to people near Sherritt’s operations.

SDG 7.A – Sherritt partnered with Global Affairs Canada and the Government of Cuba to co-fund a multi-year women’s empowerment project to install renewable energy solar panels. This is being implemented by Cowater International in partnership with Union Eléctrica.

SDG 8.4 – Sherritt’s economic benefit footprint in the areas where it operates was $500 million in 2020.

SDG 17.17 – Sherritt has partnered with Trans Canada Trail to support the construction of a trail section across the North Saskatchewan River to add connectivity and improve safety for people crossing the river. Read more here.

Goal 5. Improve diversity at all levels throughout the company.

Goal 5
Targets
  • Increase board and executive team composition to at least 30% women by 2022
  • Increase women in the workforce to 36% by 2030
  • All operations to implement Sherritt’s diversity and inclusion framework

In 2020, Sherritt successfully completed 85% of the objectives set out in year 1 of the diversity and inclusion (D&I) five-year framework.

Ongoing implementation of local-level D&I five-year plans continued through the site-level D&I committees at each location.

Sherritt signed the BlackNorth Initiative Pledge.

SDG 5.5 – In 2020, the Fort Site employees established leadHERS, Sherritt’s first employee resource group (ERG). The mission of leadHERS is to cultivate an inclusive environment that supports and encourages women through opportunity, collaboration and advocacy.

SDG 5.5 – Sherritt is committed to increasing the proportion of women among the total workforce to 36% by 2030.

SDG 8.5 – Sherritt is committed to pay and promotion equity and performs an annual internal assessment of the pay equity situation for Sherritt employees.

Goal 6. Be recognized as a “preferred supplier” of responsibly produced products.

Goal 6
Focus Area Targets

External Frameworks

  • Comply with the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas by 2024
  • Comply with London Metal Exchange responsible sourcing requirements by 2024
  • Comply with the Cobalt Industry Responsible Assessment Framework (CIRAF) by 2024

Management Systems

  • All operations independently verified to have achieved Level A in TSM Prevention of Child and Forced Labour Protocol by 2024
  • Fort Site: ISO 45001 and ISO 14001 certified by 2023
  • Moa Nickel: ISO 45001 and ISO 14001 certified by 2025

In 2020, Sherritt improved conformance with the OECD 5-Step Framework and with CIRAF.

Completed an independent OECD-aligned audit of responsible production and supply policies and due diligence management systems.

Developed a Supplier Code of Conduct.

For more information on 2020 performance, click here.

SDG 8.7 – In 2020, Sherritt and its subsidiaries implemented policies committing the organizations to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour.

SDG 12.6 – In 2020, Sherritt continued to implement a multi-year action plan to adopt policies and management systems that promote sustainable practices and integrate responsible production and supply information into its reporting cycle.

GRI and SASB Index

We have aligned our report with the Global Reporting Initiative’s GRI Standards Guide and with the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) Metals and Mining Standard. See www.globalreporting.org and www.sasb.org for more information.

In reference to the GRI standards GRI 303: Water and Effluents (2018), GRI 306: Waste (2020) and GRI 403: Occupational Health and Safety (2018), Sherritt has not been able to obtain the necessary information due to the organizational effects of COVID-19. Sherritt is committed to complying with the GRI Core requirements and is gathering the required information in 2021. Disclosures related to those standards will be included in the next Annual Sustainability Report.

General Standard Disclosures
General Standard Disclosures
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Organizational Profile
102-1 Name of the organization

About Sherritt

102-2 Activities, brands, products and services

About Sherritt

Supplying a Sustainable Future

102-3 Location of headquarters

About Sherritt

102-4 Location of operations

About Sherritt – Map and Description

About Sherritt – Divisions and Products

102-5 Ownership and legal form

About Sherritt

102-6 Markets served

About Sherritt – Map and Description

About Sherritt – Divisions and Products

102-7 Scale of the organization

About Sherritt – 2020 Key Indicators

2020 Financial Results

102-8 Information on employees and other workers

About Sherritt – 2020 Key Indicators

View Data Table

Information on employees and other workers

Disclosure Components Year Canada Cuba2 Other3 Total Sherritt
Full-time
Men 2020 625 2,236 4 2,865
2019 619 2,312 4 2,935
Women 2020 155 214 12 381
2019 148 209 12 369
Unknown 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Part-time
Men 2020 9 0 0 9
2019 11 0 0 11
Women 2020 4 0 0 4
2019 9 0 0 9
Unknown 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Permanent
Men 2020 634 2,236 4 2,874
2019 630 2,312 4 2,946
Women 2020 159 214 12 385
2019 157 209 12 378
Unknown 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Temporary1
Men 2020 2 0 2 4
2019 5 0 1 6
Women 2020 4 0 0 4
2019 5 0 0 5
Unknown 2020 22 0 0 22
2019 39 0 0 39

1Temporary employees included consultants or positions currently filled by contractors.

2Includes the office in Havana, Sherritt and GNC employees at the Moa Nickel Site, as well as employees of the entities which make up the OGP businesses (including Energas).

3“Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture and OGP Spain.

102-9 Supply chain

About Sherritt – Our Supply Chain

Operating Ethically – Responsible Production and Supply

102-10 Significant changes to the organization and its supply chain

About Sherritt – Divisions and Products

102-11 Precautionary Principle or approach

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility

102-12 External initiatives

Our Approach – Sustainability Framework

Our Approach – Sustainability Goals

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Public Safety

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Site Security – Case Study

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

Operating Ethically – Responsible Production and Supply

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

102-13 Membership of associations

Our Approach – Sustainability Framework

Our Approach – Sustainability Goals

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Public Safety

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Site Security – Case Study

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

Operating Ethically – Responsible Production and Supply

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

Strategy
102-14 Statement from senior decision-maker

CEO Message

102-15 Key impacts, risks and opportunities

CEO Message

Our Approach – Materiality

2020 Financial Results – Management’s Discussion and Analysis

Ethics and Integrity
102-16 Values, principles, standards and norms of behaviour

Our Approach

Operating Ethically

102-17 Mechanisms for advice and concerns about ethics

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

Management Information Circular – Governance

Governance
102-18 Governance structure

Our Approach – Governance

Management Information Circular – Governance

Stakeholder Engagement
102-40 List of stakeholder groups

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

102-41 Collective bargaining agreements

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Percentage of total employees covered by collective bargaining agreements

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate Total Sherritt2
Percentage of total employees covered by collective bargaining agreements 2020 49.5% In Cuba, all organized labour considerations are mandated by the Cuban state, and many systems and tools common in other jurisdictions are not employed there. 0 40.3%
2019 54.3% 0 42.2%

1Hourly employees as a percentage of total employees at the Fort Site only.

2Calculated as a percentage of headcount (permanent employees), excluding Cuban local nationals.

102-42 Identifying and selecting stakeholders

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

102-43 Approach to stakeholder engagement

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

102-44 Key topics and concerns raised

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

Reporting Practice
102-45 Entities included in the consolidated financial statements

2020 Financial Results – Management’s Discussion and Analysis

102-46 Defining report content and topic Boundaries

Our Approach – Materiality

About This Report

102-47 List of material topics

Our Approach – Materiality

102-48 Restatements of information

2020 Annual Information Form – Overview of the Business

About This Report

102-49 Changes in reporting

About This Report

102-50 Reporting period

About This Report

102-51 Date of most recent report

About This Report

102-52 Reporting cycle

About This Report

102-53 Contact point for questions regarding the report

About This Report

102-54 Claims of reporting in accordance with the GRI Standards

About This Report

102-55 GRI content index

This table is the GRI Content Index.

102-56 Policy/practice for external assurance

About This Report

Management Approach Disclosures
Management Approach Disclosures
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Our Approach – Materiality

View Data Table

Explanation of the material topic and its boundary

The following table describes medium- and high-priority material issues:
Material Issue Characterization
Country Risks Shifting U.S./Cuba relations
Uncertainties associated with changes in leadership
Project delays from lengthy decision-making processes in Cuba
Economic situation in Cuba
Tailings Tailings management, risks and capacity
Waste rock
Stakeholder topics
Economic Performance Financial performance
Long-term sustainability/viability
Debt management
R&D/innovation
Responsible Sourcing Supply chain traceability and ethical sourcing
Life cycle impacts
Health and Safety Safety leadership and culture
Workplace occupational health and safety
Fatality prevention
Climate Change Adaptation Adaptation to and mitigation of climate change
Public Safety Emergency and crisis preparedness
Community awareness and preparedness around safety and industrial risks
Community health issues
Security Human rights in private and public security
Employee Relations Employee engagement
Labour rights
Discrimination and harassment
Diversity, Inclusion and Talent Management Recruitment and retention
Diversity and inclusion
Training and development
Water Quantity and access
Effluent quality and quantity (excluding tailings)
Unplanned releases
Energy and GHG Emissions GHG emissions
Energy efficiency
Renewable energy sources
Environmental Liabilities, Closure and Reclamation Progressive reclamation
Legacy issues and liabilities
Long-term management and decommissioning
Financial assurance
Human Rights Respecting human rights
Resettlement
Child and forced labour
Security and human rights
Stakeholder and Indigenous Engagement Community relations
Community response mechanisms/grievance mechanisms
Partnerships
Social licence
Community Development Infrastructure and regional development
Community investment
Capacity building
Local Economic Benefits Local procurement
Local hiring
Economic diversification
Air and Other Emissions Dust and odours
Heavy metals
Noise
Releases (e.g., H2S, SOX, NOX)
103-2 Number of grievances filed, addressed and resolved

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Number of grievances filed, addressed and resolved

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate Total Sherritt
Labour practices
Total number of grievances about labour practices filed through formal grievance mechanisms during the reporting period 2020 20 In Cuba, all organized labour considerations are mandated by the Cuban state, and many systems and tools common in other jurisdictions are not employed there. There were no grievances reported by expatriates or Canada-based employees. 0 20
2019 18 0 18
Of the identified grievances about labour practices, how many were addressed during the reporting period? 2020 20 0 20
2019 18 0 18
Of the identified grievances about labour practices, how many were resolved during the reporting period? 2020 6 0 6
2019 7 0 7
Total number of grievances about labour practices filed prior to the reporting period that were resolved during the reporting period 2020 14 0 14
2019 11 0 11
Internal
Labour grievances filed through formal grievance mechanisms during the reporting period 2020 20 In Cuba, all organized labour considerations are mandated by the Cuban state, and many systems and tools common in other jurisdictions are not employed there. There were no grievances reported by expatriates or Canada-based employees. 0 20
2019 18 0 18
Discrimination 2020 1 0 1
2019 3 0 3
Other 2020 19 0 19
2019 15 0 15
External
Environment 2020 2 0 2
2019 1 0 1
Livelihood/land access 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Human rights 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Social or community 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Other 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Economic Performance
Economic Performance
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Material Topic: Economic Performance
103 Management approach disclosures

Our Approach – Materiality

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

About Sherritt  – Economic Performance

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

201-1 Direct economic value generated and distributed

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

About Sherritt  – Economic Performance

2020 Financial Results – Management’s Discussion and Analysis

View Data Table

Direct Economic Value Generated and Distributed1

(C$ millions, for the year ended December 31, 2020)
Disclosure Components Year Moa Nickel Site
and Fort Site
OGP Corporate and Other Total Sherritt
Revenues 2020 425.50 62.10 9.40 497.00
2019 461.00 75.00 10.20 546.20
Costs
Operating costs (costs of sales), excluding depreciation, employee costs and community investments disclosed below 2020 253.39 28.81 6.42 288.61
2019 282.67 39.19 7.70 330.30
Employee wages and benefits 2020 97.50 21.00 36.40 154.90
2019 105.20 23.30 28.10 156.60
Spending on capital 2020 32.20 2.30 0 34.50
2019 33.60 30.10 0.10 63.80
Payments to governments2 2020 28.22 2.21 0 30.42
2019 29.516 3.39 0 32.90
Community investment3, 4, 5 2020 0.41 0.19 0.38 0.99
2019 0.43 0.31 0.21 0.95
Total economic value distributed 2020 411.72 54.51 43.20 509.42
2019 445.85 96.29 35.90 583.60
Economic value retained or invested (pre-calculated as “Direct economic value generated” less “Economic value distributed”) 2020 13.78 7.59 (33.80) (12.42)
2019 15.15 (21.29) (25.70) (37.40)

1These figures reflect Sherritt’s ownership share in 2020, and reporting for the Moa Joint Venture and Fort Saskatchewan facility are combined to align with other financial disclosures. Some of this information is more fully disclosed in our financial disclosures available here.

2Includes fines and penalties, where appropriate. These payments are calculated based on ownership basis.

3Includes cash investments, employee time during working hours, and in-kind valuations.

4The OGP and Moa Nickel Site valuations for community investment are allocated on a 100% basis to Sherritt.

5Includes program management costs of the community investment program for direct Sherritt employees only.

6The payments made to governments in 2019 were updated at the Fort Site to include payments made to both national and local governments.

Note: There may be some discrepancies between Sherritt’s economic disclosures and the ESTMA filing, due to differences in reporting scope and definitions.

201-2 Financial implications and other risks and opportunities due to climate change

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

201-4 Financial assistance received from government

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

2020 Financial Results – Overview of the Business

View Data Table

Financial assistance received from government1

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total monetary value of financial assistance received by the organization from governments, by country2 2020 $13,668,379
(Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) program (COVID) and Alberta Job Grant program)
Not applicable Not applicable
2019 $227,879
(Canada–Alberta Job Grant program)
Not applicable Not applicable

1See the “Overview of the Business” section in our 2020 Financial Results for information on whether, and the extent to which, governments are present in the shareholding structure.

2These figures are based on a 100% ownership structure.

Material Topic: Market Presence
103 Management approach disclosures

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

202-2 Proportion of senior management hired from the local community

View Data Table

Proportion of senior management hired from the local community at significant locations of operation

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Percentage of senior management1 at significant locations of operation that are hired from the local2 community 2020 86% 90% 71% 100%
2019 79% 90% 71% 100%

1Definition: Manager (of a group), Director, Controller, Senior Counsel, VP, SVP, CFO, COO, President or CEO.

2“Local community” refers to national-level hiring at Cuban sites, with special consideration for communities adjacent to our operations. In Fort Saskatchewan, a local is from the province of Alberta, with special consideration for workers who live in the Edmonton Census Metropolitan Area. At Corporate, local refers to the Greater Toronto Area.

Material Topic: Indirect Economic Impacts
103 Management approach disclosures

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

203-1 Infrastructure investments and services supported

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

View Data Table

Infrastructure investments and services supported

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Cuba

Extent of development of significant infrastructure investments and services supported

Current or expected positive or negative impacts on communities and local economies

2020

There were no significant investments in infrastructure in 2020.

In Cuba, Sherritt has invested in public infrastructure through its Community Investment Program, including, among other things, street lighting; sanitation and construction equipment; roads; transportation services; and equipment for hospitals, schools and retirement homes.

OGP: Investments provided road repair equipment, equipment to improve potable water supply, garbage bins, equipment to increase refrigeration capacity, and spare parts and maintenance for equipment donated in previous years.

2019

There were no significant investments in infrastructure in 2019.

In Cuba, Sherritt has invested in public infrastructure through its Community Investment Program, including, among other things, street lighting; sanitation and construction equipment; roads; transportation services; and equipment for hospitals, schools and retirement homes.

OGP: Investments provided road repair equipment, submersible water pumps with the control panels and accessories for supporting potable water distribution, and equipment for the maintenance of green areas and for pipe cleaning. These projects will support government efforts to supply potable water to communities.

203-2 Significant indirect economic impacts

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

SI-1 Economic benefit footprint

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

View Data Table

Economic Benefit Footprint

(C$ millions)
Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site1,2 OGP1 Total Sherritt
Payments to governments 2020 12.55 31.33 5.93 49.81
2019 15.706 27.62 8.50 51.82
Local/national procurement3 2020 164.91 164.47 35.36 364.74
2019 167.17 107.91 37.22 312.29
Local salaries, wages and benefits 2020 99.57 54.22 12.44 166.23
2019 108.47 53.39 12.73 174.58
Community investment4 2020 0.07 0.29 0.19 0.55
2019 0.05 0.32 0.31 0.68
Economic benefit footprint5 2020 277.09 250.30 53.93 581.32
2019 285.82 189.24 58.76 539.38

1Data collected in USD; converted using Bank of Canada’s 2020 average exchange rate of 1.34.

2An increase in local and national procurement as well as in local salaries at Moa in 2020 were due to an increase in the workforce and more productive results, higher taxes and an increase in services and purchases from new suppliers established in the Mariel Special Zone.

3For the Cuba operations, local procurement is calculated at the national level. For the Fort Site operations, local procurement is calculated at the provincial level (Alberta).

4Includes cash investments, employee volunteer time during working hours, and in-kind valuations.

5This calculation includes the sum of the value of local and national suppliers, local salaries and wages, payments to government, and community investment. All reported on a 100% ownership basis.

6The payments made to governments in 2019 were updated at the Fort Site to include payments made to both national and local governments.

Material Topic: Procurement Practices
103 Management approach disclosures

About Sherritt – Our Supply Chain

Operating Ethically – Responsible Production and Supply

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

204-1 Proportion of spending on local suppliers

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

View Data Table

Proportion of spending on local suppliers1

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site2 OGP
Percentage of the procurement budget used for significant locations of operation spent on suppliers local1 to that operation 2020 79% 34% 39%
2019 81% 44% 34%

1“Local” suppliers refers to the national level for Cuba and to the provincial level (Alberta) for the Fort Site.

2Purchases at Moa increased in 2020 compared to 2019; however, the main suppliers of raw materials and purchases of mining and technological equipment are international, so higher amounts were paid to these suppliers.

Material Topic: Anti-Corruption
103 Management approach disclosures

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

205-1 Operations assessed for risks related to corruption

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

View Data Table

Operations assessed for risks related to corruption

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Total number and percentage of operations assessed for risks related to corruption 2020 100% 100% 100% 100%
2019 100% 100% 100% 100%
Significant risks related to corruption identified through the risk assessment 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0

On a quarterly basis, the Corporation assesses its operations across all divisions for risks related to corruption and, to date, has not identified any significant risks.

Note: Sherritt does not have production in countries with the 20 lowest rankings in the Corruption Perceptions Index.

205-2 Communication and training about anti-corruption policies and procedures

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

View Data Table

Communication and training about anti-corruption policies and procedures

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Total percentage of employees to whom the organization’s anti-corruption policies and procedures have been communicated and who have been trained on these policies and procedures, broken down by employee category and region1, 2 2020 100%

100%

All contracts that empower suppliers to represent Sherritt include appropriate safeguards to ensure compliance with our Anti-Corruption Policy. Contractors are not required to do training at this time.

100%
2019 100% 100%
Total percentage of governance body members who have received training on anti-corruption, broken down by region (training includes being communicated to)3 2020 100% 100% 100% 85.7%
2019 100% 100% 100% 85.7%

1Only Sherritt workers in Canada, as well as Canadian expatriates, are currently eligible for training. Training for other joint venture partners and workers is not within scope of Sherritt’s policy. We are, however, exploring opportunities to provide a high-level presentation on anti-corruption to Cuban nationals so that they have a greater awareness of Canadian and international standards in this evolving area.

2Sherritt has revised its onboarding procedure to include anti-corruption training and certification on the anti-corruption policy for all new salaried employees. This change was put into effect concurrently with the rollout of the updated anti-corruption training module in 2019.

3Those eligible for this training include Sherritt’s Board of Directors and Sherritt employees who sit on boards of subsidiary companies or joint ventures. Non-Sherritt representatives are not within scope of the policy’s training requirements.

Environmental Performance
Environmental Performance
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Material Topic: Energy
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

302-1 Energy consumption within the organization

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

View Data Table

Energy consumption within the organization

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Total Sherritt
Total fossil fuel consumption (TJ) 2020 4,302 6,251 29,031 39,584
2019 4,362 5,873 28,714 38,949
Total fossil fuel consumption as a percentage of total energy usage at the division 2020 85% 96% 97% 96%
2019 85% 96% 97% 96%
Total electricity consumption (TJ) 2020 557 240 752 1,550
2019 573 239 815 1,627
Total electricity consumption as a percentage of total energy usage at the division 2020 11% 4% 3% 4%
2019 11% 4% 3% 4%
Total waste fuel consumption (TJ) 2020 174 0 0 174
2019 196 0 0 196
Total energy usage (TJ) 2020 5,033 6,491 29,783 41,308
2019 5,131 6,112 29,529 40,772
Other sources of energy consumption
Total coal consumption (GJ) 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Total fuel consumption from renewable fuel sources (solar, wind, etc.) 2020 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
2019
Heating consumption 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Cooling consumption 2020 Not applicable 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Steam consumption (tonnes)1 2020 0 4,602,000 0 4,602,000
2019 0 4,383,666 0 4,383,666
Energy sold
Electricity sold (TJ) 2020 0 0 6,759 6,759
2019 0 0 8,166 8,166
Heating sold (TJ) 2020 0 Not applicable Not applicable 0
2019 0 0
Cooling sold (TJ) 2020 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
2019
Steam sold (TJ)1 2020 60 Not applicable Not applicable 60
2019 76 76

1The steam at the Moa Nickel Site is generated by burning fossil fuels and sulphur on site. The steam is consumed internally on site in the process and to generate electricity.

SI-2 Types of fuel use

View Data Table

Types of fuel use

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Fuel use of coal/lignite (metric tonnes) 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Fuel use of natural gas (m3) 2020 112,158,000 9,473 708,798,6002
2019 111,923,000 9,042 770,666,000
Fuel use of crude oil/diesel (m3) (includes crude oil, fuel oil, jet fuel, heavy fuel oil, kerosene, etc.) 2020 5801 135,076 1,7313
2019 2,397 122,935 3,119
Alternative fuel use (%) 2020 0% 0% 0%
2019 0% 0% 0%
Biomass fuel use (%) 2020 0% 0% 0%
2019 0% 0% 0%

1The amount of diesel used in 2020 at the Fort Site decreased by 75%, after seeing an anomaly in 2019. The increased use of diesel seen in 2019 was largely due to the use of rental air compressors while the normal electric compressor was being repaired.

2The decrease in the use of natural gas at OGP in 2020 was due to a lack of available gas.

3The decrease of diesel consumption at OGP in 2020 was due to decreased production; diesel usage is linked to production.

Material Topic: Water
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Water

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

303-1 Water withdrawal by source

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Water

View Data Table

Water withdrawal by source1

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total water withdrawal (m3) 2020 2,260,000 15,178,062 5,124,111
2019 2,370,000 14,882,947 4,906,977
Surface water, including water from wetlands, rivers and lakes (m3) 2020 2,170,000 13,330,421 0
2019 2,270,000 13,319,368 0
Saltwater (m3) 2020 0 0 4,896,383
2019 0 0 4,452,956
Groundwater (m3) 2020 0 0 49,6352
2019 0 0 62,008
Rainwater collected directly and stored by the organization (m3) 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Waste water from another organization (m3) 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 923
Municipal water supplies or other water utilities (m3) 2020 100,000 1,847,641 178,093
2019 100,000 1,563,579 195,983

1Data is collected from meters and some estimates; collection methodologies differ between sites.

2The decrease in groundwater use at OGP was due to a decrease in production at Boca; therefore, not as much water makeup was required.

SI-3 Water discharge

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Water

View Data Table

Water discharge

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Waste water (m3)1 2020 1,460,000 Not available 29,462
2019 1,500,000 28,772
Discharges to water (m3) 2020 Not available Not available 3,809,907
2019 3,313,646
Chemical oxygen demand of discharges (metric tonnes) 2020 95 Not available Not available
2019 117.4
Biological demand of discharges (metric tonnes) 2020 6.6 Not available Not available
2019 23.6

1The total volume of water discharged by the company after use in business activities, including water effluents.

303-3 Water recycled and reused

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Water

View Data Table

Water recycled and reused

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site OGP2
Total volume of water recycled (m3) 2020 0 4,899,992 0
2019 0 4,873,787 0
Total volume of water recycled and reused as a percentage of total water withdrawal 2020 28.32% 32.00% 81.00%
2019 29.11% 33.00% 80.56%
Reclaimed water use (m3) 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Process water use (m3) 2020 2,260,000 14,614,090 179,904
2019 2,370,000 13,954,936 196,030
Cooling water inflow (m3) 2020 640,000 948,061 4,435,500
2019 690,000 966,596 4,006,698
Total water withdrawal (m3) 2020 2,260,000 15,178,062 5,124,111
2019 2,370,000 14,882,947 4,906,977

1The reduction in cooling water diverted in 2019 at the Fort Site may have been partially due to a rental compressor that used less water than the Sherritt-owned compressor that was inoperative for much of 2019.

2At OGP, the total volume of water recycled and reused increased significantly in 2019 because cooling water was not included in the calculation in 2018.

Material Topic: Biodiversity
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

304-1 Operational sites owned, leased, managed in or adjacent to protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

304-2 Significant impacts of activities, products and services on biodiversity

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

304-3 Habitats protected or restored

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

View Data Table

Habitats protected or restored

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total size of protected areas (ha) 2020 Not applicable. There are no regulatory, licence or other requirements to protect or restore habitats.
2019
Total size of restored areas (ha) 2020 Rehabilitated land data is provided in table MM3 below
2019
MM1 Amount of land (owned or leased, and managed for production activities or extractive use) disturbed or rehabilitated

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

View Data Table

Amount of land (owned or leased, and managed for production activities or extractive use) disturbed or rehabilitated

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site2, 3 OGP Total Sherritt
Total amount of land disturbed and not yet rehabilitated (ha) 2020 131 874.87 53.97 1,059.84
2019 131 832.44 53.97 1,017.41
Total amount of land newly disturbed within the reporting period (ha) 2020 0 82.43 0 82.43
2019 0 56.70 0 56.70
Total amount of land newly rehabilitated within the reporting period to the agreed end use (ha) 2020 Not applicable 40.00 Not applicable 40.00
2019 20.54 20.54
Total land rehabilitated since start of project – estimate (ha) 2020 Not applicable 790.12 Not applicable 790.12
2019 750.04 750.04

Note: Total amount of land disturbed and not yet rehabilitated refers to the expansion of the mine footprint in the reporting year and does not include rehabilitated land in the reporting year.

12019 data of the total amount of land disturbed at the Fort Site was sourced from a biodiversity assessment that calculated the “Principal Disturbance Area” (PDA) of the Fort Site. Land disturbance at the Fort Site has remained relatively unchanged since 1954, but this area now includes agricultural land owned by Sherritt.

2Data reported for the Moa Nickel Site represents land disturbance that occurred from 1994 onwards – or the years that the Moa Joint Venture between Sherritt and the Cuban state has been in place. The data do not reflect any mining activity at the site that pre-dates the joint venture.

3Total land newly disturbed at the Moa Nickel Site increased in 2020 due to advantage taken of rental equipment available in Cuba. This machinery was used to clear additional land, ahead of plan, in preparation for mining operations in the future. Newly rehabilitated land during 2020 also increased, mainly due to increased rehabilitation efforts in accordance with the Tarea Vida plan and due to increased workforce from contractors.

MM2 Sites requiring biodiversity management plans

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

View Data Table

Sites requiring biodiversity management plans

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site2 OGP1
Total number of operations requiring biodiversity management plans (BMP) 2020 1 0 0
2019 1 0 0
Number of total operations that have been assessed under the criteria as in need of a BMP 2020 1 Not applicable Not applicable
2019 1
Percentage of total operations that have been assessed under the criteria as in need of a BMP 2020 100% Not applicable Not applicable
2019 100%
Of the number of operations in need of a BMP, the number that have a BMP in place and operational 2020 1 Not applicable Not applicable
2019 1
Of the number of operations in need of a BMP, the percentage that have a BMP in place and operational 2020 100% Not applicable Not applicable
2019 100%

1No regulatory obligations requiring a BMP; however, since Sherritt is implementing TSM, these sites are developing site-level BMPs.

2The previous BMP reported at the Moa Nickel Site was linked to Humboldt Park requirements, which were completed in 2017. Sherritt management is advocating to the Moa Joint Venture management for the development of a new BMP that aligns with Sherritt’s Biodiversity Management Standard and with TSM.

Material Topic: Emissions
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

View Data Table

Direct (scope 1) ghg emissions

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP2 Total Sherritt
Scope 1 emissions (kt CO2e) 2020 334 602 1,062 1,998
2019 335 556 1,402 2,293
Sources included in the GHG emissions calculation 2020 CO2, CH4, N2O CO2, CH4 CO2, HFC
2019 CO2, CH4, N2O CO2, CH4 CO2
Other site-specific indicators 2020 43 kt of technology fund credits (>10% of total emissions) Not applicable Not applicable
2019 17 kt of credits purchased (> 5% of total emissions)1

1All of the credits are accredited by the Alberta Carbon Registry.

2In 2020, OGP reported a 24% decrease from the previous year due to a reduction in gas available for processing.

305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

View Data Table

Energy indirect (scope 2) ghg emissions

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site1 OGP Total Sherritt
Scope 2 emissions (kt CO2e) 2020 792 61 7 147
2019 59 60 0 119

1Purchased grid electricity.

2Purchased grid electricity and purchased hydrogen.

305-7 Nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulphur oxides (SOx) and other significant air emissions

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

View Data Table

Nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides and other significant air emissions

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site1 OGP3
Air emissions – NOx (tonnes) 2020 1,374 1,446 4,805
2019 1,264 1,722 6,065
Air emissions – SOx (tonnes) 2020 0 13,354 14,135
2019 0 12,211 26,208
Air emissions – SO2 (tonnes) 2020 101 Not available 27,882
2019 87 Not available
Air emissions – CO (tonnes) 2020 198 Not available Not available
2019 Not available
Air emissions – TPM (tonnes) 2020 93 Not available Not available
2019 80
Air emissions – Persistent organic pollutants (tonnes) 2020 0 Not available Not available
2019 0
Air emissions – Volatile organic compounds (tonnes) 2020 10 Not available Not available
2019 10
Air emissions – Hazardous air pollutants (tonnes) 2020 11.2 Not available Not available
2019 11.1
Source or emission factors US EPA Air Emissions Factors US EPA Air Emissions Factors Measured by Gamma2

1In 2020, NOx decreased at the Moa Nickel Site due to a substantial reduction in operating hours of heavy equipment due to lower availability and utilization of equipment.

2The 46% reduction in SOx at OGP is attributable to the reduction in gas and to a sulphur plant (Train B) being repaired and put back in service in Varadero. With the plant up and running, more SOx was being processed and made into solid sulphur as opposed to being flared.

3OGP works with Gamma, operating on behalf of the Cuban environmental regulator CITMA, on matters of environmental monitoring.

Material Topic: Effluents and Waste
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Waste

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

Waste by Type and Disposal Method

Disclosure Components Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total waste (tonnes) 2,744 16,837 8,9642
Waste recycled – includes recyclables sent off site (batteries, plastics, electronics, etc.)1 (tonnes) 99 692 225
Waste sent to landfills (tonnes) 2,682 13,746 3,408 m3
Hazardous waste (tonnes) 1,049 2,4443 73

1Decrease in waste generated in 2019 was due largely to lower capital spending and austerity measures.

2Waste increase at OGP was due to the replacement of three large condensate tanks, and to the decommissioning of some sections of the Varadero facility and removal of equipment.

3In 2018, an increase took place in the Moa Nickel Site due to work in the Sulphur Storage Area, which was necessary to extract all the contaminated soil. In 2019, this work did not take place and consequently hazardous waste decreased.

Recycled Waste Breakdown1
Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Batteries (tonnes) 107.02
Plastics (tonnes) 0.17
Paper 38.00 tonnes 180.00 kg
Electronics (tonnes) 0.42
Used oil (tonnes) 49.00 44.67 144.792
Tires (units) 328.00
Fluorescent bulbs 0.05 tonnes + 54 units

1Waste recycled – same units of items collected were added up. Methodology and reporting expected constant improvement.

2Litres of used oil were converted to tonnes using a conversion factor of 1,100 L/t.

306-3 Significant spills (GRI 2016)

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

View Data Table

Significant spills (GRI 2016)

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Total Sherritt
Total number of recorded significant spills1 2020 0 0 1 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Total volume of recorded significant spills (m3) 2020 Not applicable Not applicable 31,0002 31,0002
2019 Not applicable Not applicable
Hydrocarbon spills (volume) (litres) 2020 37.5 0 31,0002 31,037.5
2019 Not available Not available Not available Not available

1Significant spill – a spill that is included in the organization’s financial statements, for example due to resulting liabilities, or is recorded as a spill by the organization.

2This incident was related to a leak from a corroded oil and gas production line that met Sherritt’s criteria for classification as a significant environmental incident. This spill was not included in the organization’s financial statements. There were no resulting liabilities. The line was repaired and the corroded section was replaced. The spill was contained and cleaned up immediately using a vacuum truck. There were no impacts on local communities or the environment.

306-3 Waste generated (GRI 2018)

View Data Table

Waste generated (GRI 2018)

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site2 OGP3 Total Sherritt
Total non-hazardous waste (tonnes) 2020 1,606 12,390 735 14,731
2019 2,744 16,837 8,964 28,545
Total hazardous waste (tonnes) 2020 2,002 1,802 725 4,529
2019 1,049 2,444 73 3,566
Total recycled waste (tonnes) 2020 145 728 175 1,048
2019 99 692 225 1,016

1Decrease in waste generated in 2020 was due largely to lower capital spending and variation in construction activity. A review of the data since 2017 shows that the volume of hazardous waste at the Fort Site in 2019 was the anomaly when compared to previous years. Although the volume of hazardous waste in 2020 doubled when viewed year-over-year, the 2020 volume is within the expected range of hazardous waste for this site.

2At the Moa Nickel Site, non-hazardous waste decreased in 2020 due to COVID-19 restrictions, which caused a reduced number of workers and activities taking place on site. Hazardous waste decreased due to a reduction of contaminated soil, with sulphur sent to the contaminated waste deposit.

3The drastic increase of hazardous waste at OGP in 2020 is due to improved reporting and record keeping, with the inclusion of sand used for blasting equipment for surface preparation. Although 2020 data shows a drastic increase of hazardous waste compared to 2019 (over 800%) due to improved reporting, the amount of hazardous waste produced aligns with that of previous years.

306-4 Waste diverted from disposal (GRI 2018)

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Waste

View Data Table

Waste diverted from disposal (GRI 2018)

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Non-hazardous waste diverted from disposal (tonnes)
Total recycling (tonnes)1 2020 145 728 175
Batteries (units) 2020 343
2019 107.02
Paper (tonnes) 2020 49 1.2
2019 38 0.2
Electronics (tonnes) 2020 9 0.02
2019 0.42
Used oil (tonnes)2 2020 43 58.86 74.6
2019 49 44.67 144.79
Tires (units) 2020 390
2019 328
Fluorescent bulbs (units) 2020 1,288
2019 0.05 tonnes + 54 units
Scrap metal (tonnes) 2020 44
2019
Various filters (oil, air, fuel) (units) 2020 1,160
2019
Hazardous waste diverted from disposal (tonnes)
Preparation for reuse 2020 Not available Not available Not available
2019
Recycling (tonnes) 2020 43 0 0
2019 Not available 0 0
Other recovery operations 2020 Not available 0 0
2019 0 0
2020 43 0 250
2019 Not available 0 Not available

1Waste recycled – same units of items collected were added up. Methodology and reporting expected constant improvement.

2Litres of used oil were converted to tonnes using a conversion factor of 1,100 L/t.

306-5 Waste directed to disposal (GRI 2018)

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Waste

View Data Table

Waste directed to disposal (GRI 2018)

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP1
Non-hazardous waste directed to disposal (tonnes)
Incineration with energy recovery (tonnes) 2020 Not available Not available Not available
2019
Incineration without energy recovery (tonnes) 2020 0.16 Not available Not available
2019 Not available
Landfilling (tonnes) 2020 1,606 9,860 2,126 m3
2019 2,682 13,746 3,408 m3
Other disposal operations (tonnes) 2020 0 0 0
2019 Not available 0 0
Hazardous waste directed to disposal (tonnes)
Incineration with energy recovery (tonnes) 2020 0.31 0 0
2019 Not available 0 0
Incineration without energy recovery (tonnes) 2020 10 0 0
2019 Not available 0 0
Landfilling (tonnes) 2020 1,992 1,802 0
2019 Not available Not available 0
Other disposal operations (tonnes) 2020 Not available 0 0
2019 Not available 0 0

1All hazardous waste at OGP is sent to various companies licensed to receive and treat this type of waste in Cuba. The only type of waste sent to landfill is domestic in nature.

MM3 Total amounts of overburden, rock, tailings and sludge and their associated risks

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

View Data Table

Total amounts of overburden, rock, tailings and sludge and their associated risks

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Total Sherritt
Total amounts of waste rock (tonnes) 2020 Not applicable 183,867 Not applicable 183,867
2019 253,449 253,449
Total amounts of overburden (tonnes) 2020 Not applicable 4,034,738 Not applicable 4,034,738
2019 2,432,948 2,432,948
Total amounts of liquid tailings and sludge (tonnes) 2020 Not applicable 12,348,254 Not applicable 12,348,254
2019 12,652,052 12,652,052
Material Topic: Environmental Compliance
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Environmental Liabilities, Closure and Reclamation

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

307-1 Non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Water

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Environmental Liabilities, Closure and Reclamation

View Data Table

Non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Significant fines and non-monetary sanctions in terms of:
Total monetary value of significant fines (millions) 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Total number of non-monetary sanctions 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Cases brought through dispute resolution mechanisms – fines (millions) 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Cases brought through dispute resolution mechanisms – non-monetary sanctions (#) 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
SI-4 High-severity environmental incidents

View Data Table

High-severity environmental incidents

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Number of high-severity environmental incidents1 2020 0 0 1 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Comments 2020 Not applicable Not applicable This incident was related to a leak from a corroded oil and gas production line. The line was repaired and the corroded section was replaced. The spill was contained and cleaned up immediately using a vacuum truck. There were no impacts on local communities or the environment. Not applicable

1A “high-severity environmental incident” is an incident that results in a significant or lasting effect to the environment as follows:

  • Unlicensed release of >10,000 litres of hydrocarbons or toxic solution to water or ground.
  • Unlicensed air emission that causes a significant off-site impact, including evacuation, damage, use impairment, illness, or other impact to neighbouring facilities or the public.
  • The upset or shutdown of a community wastewater treatment facility or contamination of a drinking water supply.
  • Significant wildlife fatalities (such as a fish or amphibian kill).
  • Unplanned closure or restriction of public transportation routes.
  • Any act triggering a subsequent investigation and/or order by a regulatory agency, other than routine follow-up.
SI-5 Reportable environmental incidents

View Data Table

Reportable environmental incidents

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Number of reportable environmental incidents1 2020 1 6 2 9
2019 1 1 0 2
Comments 2020 Air quality–related incident. Technical non-compliance with our licence with no lasting impacts. Water quality–related incidents. All of them of medium severity with no lasting impacts. Ground quality–related incidents, of low and medium severity with no lasting impacts. No employees or community members were harmed while these incidents occurred or while they were addressed.

1A “reportable environmental incident” is a permit or licence exceedance or non-compliance for air, water or ground that requires reporting to a regulatory agency. This includes administrative non-compliance incidents.

Material Topic: Supplier Environmental Assessment
103 Management approach disclosures

Operating Ethically – Responsible Production and Supply

308-1 New suppliers that were screened using environmental criteria

Operating Ethically – Responsible Production and Supply

View Data Table

New suppliers that were screened using environmental criteria

Disclosure Components Year Sherritt
Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using environmental criteria 2020 100%
308-2 Negative environmental impacts in the supply chain and actions taken

Operating Ethically – Responsible Production and Supply

View Data Table

Negative environmental impacts in the supply chain and actions taken

Disclosure Components Year Sherritt
Number of suppliers assessed for environmental impacts 2020 Not available
Number of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative environmental impacts 2020 Not available
Significant actual and potential negative environmental impacts identified in the supply chain 2020 Not available
Percentage of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative environmental impacts with which improvements were agreed upon as a result of assessment 2020 Not available
Percentage of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative environmental impacts with which relationships were terminated as a result of assessment, and why 2020 Not available
Social Performance: Labour Practices
Social Performance: Labour Practices
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Material Topic: Employment
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

401-1 New employee hires and employee turnover

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

New employee hires and employee turnover

Disclosure Components1 Year Canada
(Fort Site and Corporate offices)
Cuba
(Moa Nickel and OGP)3
Other4
Male Female Male Female Male Female
Employee new hires (%) 2020 70.00% 30.00% 0% 0% 0% 0%
2019 77.90% 22.10% 100% 0% 78.70% 21.30%
Employee new hires (#) 2020 63 27 0 0 0 0
2019 67 19 5 0 2 1
Ratio: entry-level wage compared to local minimum wage2 2020 276% 243% Not available Not available
2019 241% 181%
Workforce by employment level (total number as at year-end)
Hourly employees 2020 312 17 Not available Not available
2019 338 13
Support (grade 12)5 2020 32 71
2019 47 73
Professional/management 2020 280 69
2019 233 69
Executive 2020 10 2
2019 12 2

1Data on employee hires and turnover broken down by age group is not available.

2This ratio is for hourly employees (in Alberta), who make up approximately 40.3% of our workforce. This does not include contractors. The Alberta minimum wage of $15 was used.

3In Cuba, employment is managed by a state-owned agency; Sherritt does not have these data.

4“Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture, and OGP Spain.

5Grade 12 represents administrative and support workers who are overtime eligible at Sherritt.

Disclosure Components Year Canada Cuba Other2 Total Sherritt
Employee turnover (%)
Men 2020 8.52% 70.83%3 25% 10.73%
2019 16.35% 22.73% 25% 17.11%
Women 2020 13.21% 0% 0% 12.28%
2019 22.93% 0% 0% 21.30%
Voluntary turnover (%)1
Men 2020 6.94% 8.33% 25% 6.95%
2019 13.17% 6.82% 25% 13.13%
Women 2020 9.43% 0% 0% 8.77%
2019 17.83% 0% 0% 16.57%
Involuntary turnover (%)
Men 2020 1.58% 62.50% 0% 3.78%
2019 3.17% 15.91% 0% 3.98%
Women 2020 3.77% 0% 0% 3.51%
2019 5.10% 0% 0% 4.73%

1Voluntary turnover includes short-term employment contracts.

2“Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture, and OGP Spain.

3The drastic turnover seen in Cuba in 2020 was due to a significant downsizing in staff in the Oil and Gas Division.

401-3 Parental leave

View Data Table

Parental leave

Disclosure Components Year Canada Cuba Other2 Total Sherritt
Number of employees who took parental leave1
Men 2020 5 0 0 5
2019 5 0 0 5
Women 2020 2 0 0 2
2019 5 0 0 5
Number of employees who returned to work after parental leave ended
Men 2020 5 0 0 5
2019 5 0 0 5
Women 2020 2 0 0 2
2019 5 0 0 5
Return-to-work and retention rate of employees who took parental leave (%)
Men 2020 100% 0% 0% 100%
2019 100% 0% 0% 100%
Women 2020 100% 0% 0% 100%
2019 100% 0% 0% 100%

1Parental leave includes maternity leave and parental leave. It does not include paid new parental leave (employees who are not otherwise eligible for maternity leave, including employees who are fathers or partners who become parents).

2“Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture, and OGP Spain.

Material Topic: Labour/Management Relations
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

402-1 Minimum notice periods regarding operational changes

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Minimum notice periods regarding operational changes

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Minimum number of weeks’ notice typically provided to employees and their elected representatives prior to the implementation of significant operational changes that could substantially affect them 2020 2 weeks (not specified in collective agreement) 2 months (standard requirement of state-run employment agency) and additional guidance provided by Cuba’s Ministry of Labour and Social Security
2019
MM4 Number of strikes and lockouts exceeding one week’s duration, by country

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Number of strikes and lockouts exceeding one week’s duration, by country

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site1 OGP1 Corporate1
Total number of strikes and lockouts that exceeded one week’s duration during the reporting period, by country 2020 0 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
2019 0

1There are no unionized employees at these locations or no unionized employees that Sherritt exercises any control or reporting over.

Material Topic: Occupational Health and Safety
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Health and Safety

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Public Safety

403-2 Types of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities1

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Health and Safety

View Data Table

Types of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities1

Disclosure Components1 Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate Total Sherritt
O&G Power
Number of work-related fatalities
Employees 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Contractors and other workers 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Third party 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Number of lost time incidents
Employees 2020 0 4 0 0 0 4
2019 1 2 0 0 0 3
Contractors and other workers 2020 0 1 0 0 0 1
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 2020 0 5 0 0 0 5
2019 1 2 0 0 0 3
Lost time incident (LTI) index2
Employees 2020 0 0.19 0 0 0 0.12
2019 0.14 0.1 0 0 0 0.09
Contractors and other workers 2020 0 0.18 0 0 0 0.12
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 2020 0 0.19 0 0 0 0.12
2019 0.12 0.08 0 0 0 0.07
Number of total recordable incidents
Employees 2020 0 4 0 0 0 4
2019 7 7 0 2 0 16
Contractors and other workers 2020 2 1 0 2 0 5
2019 0 1 2 1 0 4
Total 2020 2 5 0 2 0 9
2019 7 8 2 3 0 20
Total recordable incident (TRI) index3
Employees 2020 0 0.19 0 0 0 0.12
2019 0.58 0.34 0 0.60 0 0.32
Contractors and other workers 2020 1.23 0.18 0 5.3 0 0.60
2019 0 0.23 1.66 1.47 0 0.38
Total 2020 0.23 0.19 0 0.56 0 0.22
2019 0.87 0.32 0.47 0.74 0 0.33

1All sites are applying the U.S. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) general recording criteria. Reference Standard 29 CFR section 1904.7. The Sherritt standard is aligned with this system of rules. We did not track occupational disease rates in 2019 or 2020, and we currently do not track these data by gender.

2LTI index = # LTI * 200,000/SUM (exposure hours for the year).

3Minor (first-aid level) injuries are not included in the TRI index.

“Employees” include: Sherritt and GNC employees seconded to the Moa Joint Venture (100% basis) and employees of the entities through which the Corporation carries on its Oil & Gas business, and employees of Energas.

“Contractors and other workers” include contractors and other workers not included in the “Employees” category.

403-4 Worker participation, consultation and communication on occupational health and safety

View Data Table

Worker participation, consultation and communication on occupational health and safety

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Description of processes for worker involvement with the occupational health and safety management system, and for communicating relevant information on occupational health and safety to workers 2020 Joint Management and Worker Health and Safety Committee. Worker involvement in incident investigations and new policy development. Review of site occupational hygiene monitoring results with workers, regular communication via toolbox meetings, monthly departmental health and safety meetings, and town halls. At Moa Nickel, a Health, Safety and Environment Committee has been established as a collective management body, which was developed with the participation of management and employees who meet on a monthly basis to monitor safety management, training and the actions implemented for risk prevention. In addition, extraordinary sessions and analyses are carried out to determine the conditions and root causes that have resulted in the occurrence of serious potential incidents (SPI) and lost time incidents (LTI), and implement measures to prevent future recurrences. Joint Work Site Health and Safety Committee established at each facility. Worker involvement in incident investigations. Regular communication via toolbox meetings, and monthly departmental health and safety meetings.
2019
Description of JHSC responsibilities, meeting frequency, decision-making authority and whether – and, if so, why – any workers are not represented by these committees1 2020

The purpose of the JHSC at the Fort Site is to improve workplace health and safety by facilitating communications between workers and employer representatives so that they can discuss workplace hazards and work together to mitigate them.

As specified in both the Safety Management Practices Manual and the Collective Agreement:

  1. The committee shall have at least four members, at minimum half of whom represent the workers and are not associated with management of the work site. Worker representatives will be appointed, as specified by the union selection criteria, and employer representatives will be appointed by the employer.
  2. The committee shall meet monthly on a prescribed date and time as determined at the prior meeting or as part of an agreed-to set schedule. The company and the union shall alternate the chairing of the meetings as co-chairpersons.
  3. A quorum of JHSC is one half of the members if both worker and employer members are present, and at least one half of those present are worker members.

Additionally, all employees are scheduled to participate in a monthly health and safety meeting. Content is prepared by Health and Safety and attendance is taken.

The objective of the Health, Safety and Environment Committee is to evaluate the performance of safety management, training and actions implemented for risk prevention. The committee is made up of management and employee representatives who meet monthly. The meetings are centred on improving work conditions in areas, actions implemented to prevent future incidents, in addition to training workers on key topics that allow them to improve their performance and apply safe work practices to raise safety standards.

There is a Joint Work Site Health and Safety Committee established in each of the three facilities at Energas. These committees are formed by both management and worker representatives, and the committees meet every three months. Members were elected by workers present during an assembly.

The responsibilities of the Joint Work Site Health and Safety Committees are to: identify unhealthy or unsafe situations at the work site; recommend corrective action; and ensure health and safety education programs are established and maintained at the work site.

2019

1JHSC stands for “Joint Health and Safety Committee”.

SI-6 Emergency preparedness

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Public Safety

View Data Table

Emergency Preparedness

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Sites with crisis communication plans 2020 Y Y Y Y
2019 Y Y Y Y
Sites with crisis/emergency preparedness and response plans 2020 Y Y Y Y
2019 Y Y Y Y
Material Topic: Diversity and Equal Opportunity
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

405-1 Diversity of governance bodies

Our Approach – Governance

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Diversity of governance bodies

Disclosure Components Total Sherritt
2020 2019
Percentage of individuals within the organization’s governance bodies (board members)
Male 71% 71%
Female 29% 29%
Under 30 years old 0 0
30–50 years old 14% 14%
Over 50 years old 86% 86%
Minority groups1 Not available Not available

1Board members who self-identify as Indigenous, as persons with a disability, or as a visible minority as defined in Canada’s Employment Equity Act.

405-1 Diversity of employees

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Diversity of employees

Disclosure Components1 Year Canada2 Cuba
Percentage of employees
Male 2020 80% 91%
2019 80% 92%
Female 2020 20% 9%
2019 20% 8%

1Includes Sherritt employees and Cuban local national employees.

2Includes permanent employees for the Fort Site, OGP Calgary and the Corporate office.

Disclosure Components1, 2 Year Metals
(Fort Site only)3
OGP4 Corporate5 Commercial and Technologies
Percentage of employees
Under 30 years old 2020 12% 5% 6% 8%
2019 13% 3% 6% 6%
30–50 years old 2020 49% 40% 56% 56%
2019 47% 47% 61% 55%
Over 50 years old 2020 39% 56% 38% 36%
2019 40% 50% 33% 38%
Employee average age (number) 2020 45 51 47 46
2019 Not available Not available Not available Not available

1Includes Sherritt employees and Cuban local national employees.

2Sherritt does not currently track percentage of minority groups for its divisions; however, local employment is the majority at all of Sherritt’s sites globally.

3Excludes the Moa Nickel Site.

4Does not include Spain, consultants or local nationals.

5Does not include consultants or local nationals.

SI-7 Diversity and equal opportunity

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Diversity and equal opportunity

Disclosure Components Year Canada1 Cuba2
Employee average age 2020 46 53
2019 46 51
Women in workforce (%)3 2020 20% 9%
2019 20% 8%
Women in management (%) 2020 18% 0%
2019 21% 0%

1Includes employees from the Fort Site and the Corporate office.

2Includes employees from the Moa Nickel Site and OGP sites (including Cuban nationals).

3Includes Sherritt employees, consultants and Cuban local national employees.

405-2 Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men

Disclosure Components Year Canada
(Fort Site and Corporate offices)
Cuba
(Moa Nickel and OGP)2
Other3
Average Basic Salary Average Total Direct Compensation Average Basic Salary Average Total Direct Compensation Average Basic Salary Average Total Direct Compensation
Male : Female Male : Female Male : Female Male : Female Male : Female Male : Female
Ratio of basic salary and total direct compensation by employment level1
Hourly employees 2020 1:0.85 1:0.85 Not available Not available
2019 1:0.9 1:0.9
Support (grade 12)4 2020 1:1.01 1:1.03
2019 1:1 1:1
Professional/management 2020 1:0.9 1:0.91
2019 1:0.9 1:0.9
Executive 2020 1:0.99 1:0.99
2019 1:1 1:1

1For each group of salaried employees, the weighted average job grade in that category was analyzed to determine the Total Direct Compensation ratio.

2In Cuba, employment is managed by a state-owned agency; Sherritt does not have these data.

3“Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture, and OGP Spain.

4Grade 12 represents administrative and support workers who are overtime eligible at Sherritt.

SI-8 Gender pay gap

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Gender pay gap

Disclosure Components1, 2 Year Canada
(Fort Site, Calgary and Corporate offices)
Cuba
(Moa Nickel Site
and OGP)
Other
Gender pay gap: Executives (%) 2020 85.02% Not available Not available
Gender pay gap: Professionals/management (%) 2020 93.96%
Gender pay gap: Support staff (%) 2020 93.91%
Gender pay gap: Total salaried employees (%) 2020 72.68%

1Percentages are based on all employees within the grouping, not the weighted average job grade as in the salaries and remuneration table above (405-2).

2Percentage represents female earnings in relation to male counterparts.

Social Performance: Human Rights
Social Performance: Human Rights
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Material Topic: Non-Discrimination
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

406-1 Incidents of discrimination and corrective actions taken

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Incidents of discrimination and corrective actions taken

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Number of incidents of discrimination on grounds of race, colour, sex, religion, political opinion, national extraction, or social origin as defined by the ILO, or other 2020 61 Incidents of discrimination in Cuba are handled by the state employment agency that provides Sherritt’s businesses and joint ventures on the island-nation with workers. The employment agency will require the involvement of Sherritt and/or its joint venture partners in discrimination cases, as appropriate. Such involvement has occurred in previous years.
2019 0

1The cases reported in 2020 at the Fort Site represent files investigated internally or externally that resulted in confirmed discrimination (inclusive of harassment and bullying). All files have been resolved with the exception of one that is currently going through the grievance procedure.

Material Topic: Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

407-1 Operations and suppliers in which the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at risk

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Operations and suppliers in which the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at risk

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Measures taken by the organization in the reporting period intended to support rights to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining 2020 Unionized employees are represented by Unifor Local 530A. In 2020, a new ratified two-year collective agreement was signed for the term April 1, 2020 to March 31, 2022. All Cuban employees hired through national agency.
2019 Unionized employees are represented by Unifor Local 530A. In April 2016, a three-year agreement came into effect. In 2019, the agreement was extended for a one-year period (until March 2020), and in late 2019 the union provided notice to bargain in 2020. All Cuban employees hired through national agency.
Material Topic: Child and Forced or Compulsory Labour
103 Management approach disclosures

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

408-1 Operations and suppliers at significant risk for incidents of child labour

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

View Data Table

Operations and suppliers at significant risk for incidents of child labour

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Measures taken by the organization in the reporting period intended to contribute to the effective abolition of child labour 2020 In Canada, the use of child labour is controlled under labour laws. In 2015, Cuba ratified the ILO’s Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, which calls for the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including slavery, trafficking, the use of children in armed conflict, the use of a child for prostitution, pornography and illicit activities (such as drug trafficking) as well as in hazardous work. Cuban legislation prohibits child labour and establishes 17 years old as the minimum age of employment.
2019
409-1 Operations and suppliers at significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labour

Operating Ethically – Responsible Production and Supply

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

View Data Table

Operations and suppliers at significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labour

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP

Operations and suppliers considered to have significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labour either in terms of:
  i.  type of operation (such as manufacturing plant) and supplier; or
  ii. countries or geographic areas with operations and suppliers considered at risk

2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Measures taken by the organization in the reporting period intended to contribute to the elimination of all forms of forced or compulsory labour 2020 Supply chain due diligence Gap analyses Gap analyses
2019 Regulatory compliance measures, policy and standard development Regulatory compliance measures Regulatory compliance measures
Material Topic: Security Practices
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Site Security

410-1 Security personnel trained in human rights policies or procedures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Site Security

View Data Table

Security personnel trained in human rights policies or procedures

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Percentage of Sherritt security personnel who have received formal training in the organization’s human rights policies or specific procedures and their application to security 2020 100% Security is provided by the Cuban state and Sherritt has no authority over their training.
2019 100%
Percentage of third-party organization security personnel who have received formal training in the organization’s human rights policies or specific procedures and their application to security 2020 20%1 Security is provided by the Cuban state and Sherritt has no authority over their training.
2019 100%

1Training of third-party security personnel decreased in 2020 due to staff turnover, limited in-person training opportunities, and limitations with instructor availability due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Material Topic: Rights of Indigenous Peoples
103 Management approach disclosures

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

411-1 Incidents of violations involving rights of Indigenous Peoples

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

View Data Table

Incidents of violations involving rights of Indigenous Peoples

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total number of identified incidents of violations involving the rights of Indigenous Peoples during the reporting period 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Status of the incidents and actions taken with reference to the following:
i.Incident reviewed by the organization;
ii.Remediation plans being implemented;
iii.Remediation plans that have been implemented, with results reviewed through routine internal management review processes; and
iv.Incident no longer subject to action
2020 Not applicable
2019

Note: Sherritt does not have proven or probable reserves in or near Indigenous lands.

Material Topic: Human Rights Assessment
103 Management approach disclosures

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

412-1 Operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or impact assessments

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

View Data Table

Operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or impact assessments

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total number of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or human rights impact assessments in country 2020 1 0 0
2019 1 0 0
Percentage of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or human rights impact assessments in country 2020 100% 0% 0%
2019 100% 0% 0%
412-2 Employee training on human rights policies or procedures

View Data Table

Employee training on human rights policies or procedures

Disclosure Components Year Sherritt
Total number of hours in the reporting period devoted to training on human rights policies or procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations 2020 Not available
Percentage of employees trained during the reporting period in human rights policies or procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations 2020 Not available
Social Performance: Society
Social Performance: Society
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Material Topic: Local Communities
103 Management approach disclosures

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

413-1 Operations with local community engagement, impact assessments and development programs

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

View Data Table

Operations with local community engagement, impact assessments and development programs

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Operations with:
Implemented local community engagement, impact assessments and development programs 2020
2019
Social impact assessments, including gender impact assessments, based on participatory processes 2020
2019
Environmental impact assessments and ongoing monitoring 2020
2019
Public disclosure of results of environmental and social impact assessments 2020
2019
Local community development programs based on local communities’ needs 2020
2019
Stakeholder engagement plans based on stakeholder mapping 2020
2019
Broad-based local community consultation committees and processes that include vulnerable groups 2020
2019
Works councils, occupational health and safety committees and other employee representation bodies to deal with impacts 2020
2019
Formal local community grievance processes 2020 In Cuba, there is a state-run system where citizens can file complaints against an entity, organization or enterprise whose activities they feel are adversely affecting their well-being.
2019
Implemented local community engagement impact assessments and development programs 2020
2019
SI-9 Number of community meetings

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

View Data Table

Number of community meetings

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Number of community meetings 2020 12 1 2
2019 22 7 14

Note: The decrease in community meetings at all sites was related to COVID-19 restrictions.

Material Topic: Socio-Economic Compliance
103 Management approach disclosures

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

419-1 Non-compliance with laws and regulations in the social and economic area

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

View Data Table

Non-compliance with laws and regulations in the social and economic area

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Significant fines and non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and/or regulations in the social and economic area 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0

To the best of Sherritt management’s knowledge, the Corporation, its subsidiaries and affiliates are in compliance in all material respects with all applicable laws and regulations in the social and economic areas in which they operate.

Material Topic: Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining
103 Management approach disclosures

To the best of management’s knowledge, artisanal and small-scale mining does not exist in Cuba.

MM8 Number and percentage of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining takes place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the action taken to manage and mitigate these risks

View Data Table

Number and percentage of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining takes place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the action taken to manage and mitigate these risks

Disclosure Components Year Cuba
Where ASM takes place on or adjacent to company sites, or presents risks to the company’s operations 2020

To the best of management’s knowledge, artisanal and small-scale mining does not exist in Cuba.

2019
Material Topic: Resettlement
103 Management approach disclosures

No resettlement took place during 2020 at any of our facilities.

MM9 Sites where resettlements took place, the number of households resettled in each, and how their livelihoods were affected in the process

View Data Table

Sites where resettlements took place, the number of households resettled in each, and how their livelihoods were affected in the process

Disclosure Components Year Moa Nickel Site
Sites where resettlement of a community occurred 2020 0
2019 0
Number of households involved in any resettlement program 2020 0
2019 0
Number of individuals involved in any resettlement program 2020 0
2019 0
Consultation processes and measures put in place to re-establish the affected community and mitigate any impacts of relocation, and the outcomes in terms of livelihoods, including sustainable land use 2020 No resettlement occurred in 2020.
2019 No resettlement occurred in 2019.
Significant disputes related to resettlement and the processes employed to resolve outstanding issues 2020 0
2019 0
Material Topic: Closure Planning
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Environmental Liabilities, Closure and Reclamation

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

MM10 Number and percentage of operations with closure plans

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Environmental Liabilities, Closure and Reclamation

View Data Table

Additional Disclosures: Oil & Gas
Additional Disclosures: Oil and Gas
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG

Number and percentage of operations with closure plans

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site OGP
Number of operations within the division that have closure plans 2020 1 1 OGP sites revert to the Cuban state upon closure.
2019
Percentage of operations within the division that have closure plans 2020 100% 100% OGP sites revert to the Cuban state upon closure.
2019

1As part of the provincial operating approval, a closure plan outlining approaches on reclamation and/or remediation was included in the Operating Approval renewal application submitted in 2018. Sherritt’s closure plan has been accepted as part of the application package and the issuance on February 1, 2021 of the Fort Site’s new Operating Approval.

Material Topic: Oil and Gas
OG1 Volume and type of estimated proven reserves and production

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

OG4 Number and percentage of significant operating sites in which biodiversity risk has been assessed and monitored

View Data Table

Number and percentage of significant operating sites in which biodiversity risk has been assessed and monitored

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
2020 2019
Criteria used to define priority sites for biodiversity conservation and where significant biodiversity risk requires Biodiversity Action Plans to be in place As regulated As regulated
Biodiversity Action Plan methodology (e.g., definitions, baseline assessments, management plans, protected areas, endemic species’ habitats, endangered species) As regulated As regulated
Number and percentage of significant operating sites where biodiversity risk has been assessed 5 operating sites
100%
5 operating sites
100%
Number and percentage of significant operating sites exposed to significant biodiversity risk 0 0
Number and percentage of significant operating sites exposed to significant biodiversity risk in which Biodiversity Action Plans have been implemented and monitored Not applicable Not applicable
OG5 Volume and disposal of formation or produced water

View Data Table

Volume and disposal of formation or produced water

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
2020 2019
Total volume of produced water (m3) 411,248 446,258
Volume of produced water by disposal method (including reused, recycled, re-injected) (m3) 403,266 435,007 m3 injected
2,340 m3 evaporation pit
Strategies and criteria for disposal and treatment, and standards used for quality of produced water discharged, including hydrocarbon and salinity Produced water is metered and injected back into formation zones. Slight variance between produced and disposal water volumes as the disposal meters are +/-5% accurate. Produced water is metered and injected back into formation zones. Slight variance between produced and disposal water volumes as the disposal meters are +/-5% accurate.
Total volume of hydrocarbon discharged within produced water Not measured continuously; however, spot checks show residual hydrocarbons are below 100 mg/L injected (licence is 125 mg/L). Estimated disposal volume of 55 m3/year based on 125 mg/L and 980 kg/m3 density. Not measured continuously; however, spot checks show residual hydrocarbons are below 100 mg/L injected (licence is 125 mg/L). Estimated disposal volume of 55 m3/year based on 125 mg/L and 980 kg/m3 density.

Note: Volume of hydrocarbon discharged within produced water is not measured at this time.

OG6 Volume of flared and vented hydrocarbon

View Data Table

Volume of flared and vented hydrocarbon

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
2020 2019
Volume of flared hydrocarbon (Mm3)1 75 66
Volume of continuously flared hydrocarbon broken down by country (Mm3)2 30 31
Volume of vented hydrocarbon 0 0
Volume of continuously vented hydrocarbon broken down by country 0 0

1The volume of flared hydrocarbon increased because of the sulphur unit outage in Varadero. When H2S is flared, additional gas has to be mixed with it to maintain ground-level dispersion.

2The reported volume of continuously flared hydrocarbon decreased because of changes in production.

OG7 Amount of drilling waste (drill mud and cuttings) and strategies for treatment and disposal

View Data Table

Amount of drilling waste (drill mud and cuttings) and strategies for treatment and disposal

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
20201 2019
Total amount of drill mud and cuttings (in tonnes) produced using non-aqueous drilling fluid (m3) Cupet – 200
Oil & Gas – 42
Cupet – 1,228
Oil & Gas – 260
Total amount of drill mud and cuttings (in tonnes) produced using aqueous drilling fluid, by disposal method (m3) 242 1,488
Treatment, disposal and minimization strategies Evaporation pond for liquids; solids are reclaimed, treated and land farmed. Evaporation pond for liquids; solids are reclaimed, treated and land farmed.

1The decrease in the amount of drill mud was due to a stop on the drilling program in 2020 for Oil & Gas and CUPET.

OG11 Number of sites that have been decommissioned and sites that are in the process of being decommissioned

View Data Table

Number of sites that have been decommissioned and sites that are in the process of being decommissioned

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
2020 2019
Number of sites (broken down into offshore and onshore) and total land area of sites (onshore only) for both active and inactive sites No sites were decommissioned in 2020. No sites were decommissioned in 2019.
Criteria for defining inactive sites End of contract
Percentage of active sites that have decommissioning plans in place Assets are transferred to state partner at end of contract.
Decommissioning approach (e.g., plans for land owners, labour transition, finance, community infrastructure, environment remediation and government sign-off, post-decommissioning monitoring and aftercare) Assets are transferred to state partner at end of contract.
Complaints on outstanding local community issues or government notices on decommissioning Not applicable
OG13 Number of process safety events, by business activity

View Data Table

Number of process safety events, by business activity

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
2020 2019
Number of Tier 1 process safety events with narrative per API RP 754 definitions and reported per business activity (refining, upstream, etc.) Not applicable
Number of Tier 2 process safety events with narrative per API RP 754 definitions and reported per business activity (refining, upstream, etc.) Not applicable
Report on asset integrity monitoring and maintenance program, including progress against actions identified

Energas – Most maintenance requirements were completed in 2020, with the exception of a couple of items that were extended to 2021.

Oil & Gas – Completed all tasks listed on the maintenance program.

Energas – 100% of PM program completed.

Oil & Gas – Yearly UT program in place to test wall thickness.

SASB Content Index
SASB Content Index
Accounting Metric Category Unit of Measure Code Data/Reference
Topic: Greenhouse Gas Emissions
(1) Gross global Scope 1 emissions
(2) Percentage covered under emissions-limiting regulations
Quantitative Metric tonnes (t) CO2e, Percentage (%) EM-MM-110a.1

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

View Data Table

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP2 Total
Scope 1 emissions (kt CO2e) 2020 334 602 1,062 1,998
2019 335 556 1,402 2,293
Sources included in the GHG emissions calculation 2020 CO2, CH4, N2O CO2, CH4 CO2, HFC
2019 CO2, CH4, N2O CO2, CH4 CO2
Other site-specific indicators 2020 43 kt of technology fund credits (>10% of total emissions) Not applicable Not applicable
2019 17 kt of credits purchased (>5% of total emissions)1

1All of the credits are accredited by the Alberta Carbon Registry.

2In 2020, OGP reported a 24% decrease from the previous year due to a reduction in gas available for processing.

Discussion of long-term and short-term strategy or plan to manage Scope 1 emissions,emissions reduction targets, and an analysis of performance against those targets Discussion and Analysis Not applicable EM-MM-110a.2

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

Topic: Air Quality
Air emissions of the following pollutants:(1) CO, (2) NOx (excluding N2O), (3) SOx, (4) particulate matter (PM10), (5) mercury (Hg), (6) lead (Pb), and (7) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) Quantitative Metric tonnes (t) EM-MM-120a.1

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

View Data Table

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site1 OGP2
Air emissions – NOx (tonnes) 2020 1,374 1,446 4,805
2019 1,264 1,722 6,065
Air emissions – SOx (tonnes) 2020 0 13,354 14,135
2019 0 12,211 26,208
Air emissions – SO2 (tonnes) 2020 101 Not available 27,882
2019 87 Not available
Air emissions – CO (tonnes) 2020 198 Not available Not available
2019 Not available
Air emissions – TPM (tonnes) 2020 93 Not available Not available
2019 80
Air emissions – Persistent organic pollutants (tonnes) 2020 0 Not available Not available
2019 0
Air emissions – Volatile organic compounds (tonnes) 2020 10 Not available Not available
2019 10
Air emissions – Hazardous air pollutants (tonnes) 2020 11.2 Not available Not available
2019 11.1
Source or emission factors US EPA Air Emissions Factors US EPA Air Emissions Factors Measured by Gamma3

1In 2020, NOx decreased at the Moa Nickel Site due to a substantial reduction in operating hours of heavy equipment due to lower availability and utilization of equipment.

2OGP works with Gamma, operating on behalf of the Cuban environmental regulator CITMA, on matters of environmental monitoring.

3The 46% reduction in SOx at OGP is attributable to the reduction in gas and to a sulphur plant (Train B) being repaired and put back in service in Varadero. With the plant up and running, more SOx was being processed and made into solid sulphur as opposed to being flared.

Topic: Energy Management
(1) Total energy consumed
(2) Percentage grid electricity
(3) Percentage renewable
Quantitative Gigajoules (GJ), Percentage (%) EM-MM-130a.1

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy, Climate Change and Air Quality

View Data Table

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Total Sherritt
Total fossil fuel consumption (TJ) 2020 4,302 6,251 29,031 39,584
2019 4,362 5,873 28,714 38,949
Total fossil fuel consumption as a percentage of total energy usage at the division 2020 85% 96% 97% 96%
2019 85% 96% 97% 96%
Total electricity consumption (TJ) 2020 557 240 752 1,550
2019 573 239 815 1,627
Total electricity consumption as a percentage of total energy usage at the division 2020 11% 4% 3% 4%
2019 11% 4% 3% 4%
Total waste fuel consumption (TJ) 2020 174 0 0 174
2019 196 0 0 196
Total energy usage (TJ) 2020 5,033 6,491 29,783 41,308
2019 5,131 6,112 29,529 40,772
Other sources of energy consumption
Total coal consumption (TJ) 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Total fuel consumption from renewable fuel sources (solar, wind, etc.) 2020 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
2019
Heating consumption 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Cooling consumption 2020 Not applicable 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Steam consumption (tonnes)1 2020 0 4,602,000 0 4,602,000
2019 0 4,383,666 0 4,383,666
Energy sold
Electricity sold (TJ) 2020 0 0 6,759 6,759
2019 0 0 8,166 8,166
Heating sold (TJ) 2020 0 Not applicable Not applicable 0
2019 0 0
Cooling sold (TJ) 2020 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
2019
Steam sold (TJ)1 2020 60 Not applicable Not applicable 60
2019 76 76

1The steam at the Moa Nickel Site is generated by burning fossil fuels and sulphur on site. The steam is consumed internally on site in the process and to generate electricity.

Topic: Water Management
(1) Total fresh water withdrawn
(2) Total fresh water consumed
(3) Percentage of each in regions with high or extremely high baseline water stress
Quantitative Thousand cubic metres (m3), Percentage (%) EM-MM-140a.1

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Water

View Data Table

Disclosure Components1 Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total water withdrawal (m3) 2020 2,260,000 15,178,062 5,124,111
2019 2,370,000 14,882,947 4,906,977
Surface water, including water from wetlands, rivers and lakes (m3) 2020 2,170,000 13,330,421 0
2019 2,270,000 13,319,368 0
Saltwater (m3) 2020 0 0 4,896,383
2019 0 0 4,452,956
Groundwater (m3) 2020 0 0 49,6352
2019 0 0 62,008
Rainwater collected directly and stored by the organization (m3) 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Waste water from another organization (m3) 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 923
Municipal water supplies or other water utilities (m3) 2020 100,000 1,847,641 178,093
2019 100,000 1,563,579 195,983

1Data is collected from meters and some estimates; collection methodologies differ between sites.

2The decrease in groundwater use at OGP was due to a decrease in production at Boca; therefore, not as much water makeup was required.

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Waste water (m3)1 2020 1,460,000 Not available 29,462
2019 1,500,000 28,772
Discharges to water (m3) 2020 Not available Not available 3,809,907
2019 3,313,646
Chemical oxygen demand of discharges (metric tonnes) 2020 95 Not available Not available
2019 117.4
Biological demand of discharges (metric tonnes) 2020 6.6 Not available Not available
2019 23.6

1The total volume of water discharged by the company after use in business activities, including water effluents.

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site OGP2
Total volume of water recycled (m3) 2020 0 4,899,992 0
2019 0 4,873,787 0
Total volume of water recycled and reused as a percentage of total water withdrawal 2020 28.32% 32.00% 81.00%
2019 29.11% 33.00% 80.56%
Reclaimed water use (m3) 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Process water use (m3) 2020 2,260,000 14,614,090 179,904
2019 2,370,000 13,954,936 196,030
Cooling water inflow (m3) 2020 640,000 948,061 4,435,500
2019 690,000 966,596 4,006,698
Total water withdrawal (m3) 2020 2,260,000 15,178,062 5,124,111
2019 2,370,000 14,882,947 4,906,977

1The reduction in cooling water diverted in 2019 at the Fort Site may have been partially due to a rental compressor that used less water than the Sherritt-owned compressor that was inoperative for much of 2019.

2At OGP, the total volume of water recycled and reused increased significantly in 2019 because cooling water was not included in the calculation in 2018.

Number of incidents of non-compliance associated with water quality permits, standards, and regulations Quantitative Number EM-MM-140a.2

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Water

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Environmental Liabilities, Closure and Reclamation

Topic: Waste and Hazardous Materials Management
(1) Total weight of tailings waste
(2) Percentage recycled
Quantitative Metric tonnes (t), Percentage (%) EM-MM-150a.1

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

View Data Table

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Total Sherritt
Total amounts of waste rock (tonnes) 2020 Not applicable 183,867 Not applicable 183,867
2019 253,449 253,449
Total amounts of overburden (tonnes) 2020 Not applicable 4,034,738 Not applicable 4,034,738
2019 2,432,948 2,432,948
Total amounts of liquid tailings and sludge (tonnes) 2020 Not applicable 12,348,254 Not applicable 12,348,254
2019 12,652,052 12,652,052
(1) Total weight of mineral processing waste
(2) Percentage recycled
Quantitative Metric tonnes (t), Percentage (%) EM-MM-150a.2
Number of tailings impoundments, broken down by MSHA hazard potential Quantitative Number EM-MM-150a.3
Topic: Biodiversity Impacts
Description of environmental management policies and practices for active sites Discussion and Analysis Not applicable EM-MM-160a.1

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

Percentage of mine sites where acid rock drainage is:
(1) predicted to occur
(2) actively mitigated
(3) under treatment or remediation
Quantitative Percentage (%) EM-MM-160a.2
Topic: Security, Human Rights and Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Percentage of (1) proved and (2) probable reserves in or near areas of conflict Quantitative Percentage (%) EM-MM-210a.1

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Site Security

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

Percentage of (1) proved reserves and (2) probable reserves in or near Indigenous land Quantitative Percentage (%) EM-MM-210a.2
Discussion of engagement processes and due diligence practices with respect to human rights, Indigenous rights, and operation in areas of conflict Discussion and Analysis Not applicable EM-MM-210a.3
Topic: Community Relations
Discussion of process to manage risks and opportunities associated with community rights and interests Discussion and Analysis Not applicable EM-MM-210b.1

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

Number and duration of non-technical delays Quantitative Number, Days EM-MM-210b.2

View Data Table

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Number and duration of non-technical delays (number and days) 2020 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0
Topic: Labour Relations
Percentage of active workforce covered under collective bargaining agreements, broken down by U.S. and foreign employees Quantitative Percentage (%) EM-MM-310a.1

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate Total Sherritt2
Percentage of total employees covered by collective bargaining agreements 2020 49.5% In Cuba, all organized labour considerations are mandated by the Cuban state, and many systems and tools common in other jurisdictions are not employed there. 0 40.3%
2019 54.3% 0 42.2%

1Hourly employees as a percentage of total employees at the Fort Site only.

2Calculated as a percentage of headcount (permanent employees), excluding Cuban local nationals.

Number and duration of strikes and lockouts Quantitative Number, Days EM-MM-310a.2

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site1 OGP1 Corporate1
Total number of strikes and lockouts that exceeded one week’s duration during the reporting period, by country 2020 0 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
2019 0

1There are no unionized employees at these locations or no unionized employees that Sherritt exercises any control or reporting over.

Topic: Workforce Health and Safety
(1) MSHA all-incidence rate
(2) Fatality rate
(3) Near miss frequency rate (NMFR)
(4) Average hours of health, safety and emergency response training for (a) full-time employees and (b) contract employees
Quantitative Rate EM-MM-320a.1

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Health and Safety

View Data Table

Disclosure Components1 Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate Total Sherritt
(O&G) Power
Number of work-related fatalities
Employees 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Contractors and other workers 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Third party 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Number of lost time incidents
Employees 2020 0 4 0 0 0 4
2019 1 2 0 0 0 3
Contractors and other workers 2020 0 1 0 0 0 1
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 2020 0 5 0 0 0 5
2019 1 2 0 0 0 3
Lost time incident (LTI) index2
Employees 2020 0 0.19 0 0 0 0.12
2019 0.14 0.1 0 0 0 0.09
Contractors and other workers 2020 0 0.18 0 0 0 0.12
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 2020 0 0.19 0 0 0 0.12
2019 0.12 0.08 0 0 0 0.07
Number of total recordable injuries
Employees 2020 0 4 0 0 0 4
2019 7 7 0 2 0 16
Contractors and other workers 2020 2 1 0 2 0 5
2019 0 1 2 1 0 4
Total 2020 2 5 0 2 0 9
2019 7 8 2 3 0 20
Total recordable incident (TRI) index3
Employees 2020 0 0.19 0 0 0 0.12
2019 0.58 0.34 0 0.60 0 0.32
Contractors and other workers 2020 1.23 0.18 0 5.3 0 0.60
2019 0 0.23 1.66 1.47 0 0.38
Total 2020 0.23 0.19 0 0.56 0 0.22
2019 0.87 0.32 0.47 0.74 0 0.33

1All sites are applying the U.S. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) general recording criteria. Reference Standard 29 CFR section 1904.7. The Sherritt standard is aligned with this system of rules. We did not track occupational disease rates in 2019 or 2020, and we currently do not track this data by gender.

2LTI index = # LTI * 200,000/SUM (exposure hours for the year).

3Minor (first-aid level) injuries are not included in the TRI index.

“Employees” include Sherritt and GNC employees seconded to the Moa Joint Venture (100% basis) and employees of the entities through which the Corporation carries on its Oil & Gas business, and employees of Energas.

“Contractors and other workers” include contractors and other workers not included in the “Employees” category.

Note: MSHA all-incident rate, near miss frequency rate and average hours of health, safety and emergency response training for 2020 are not available.

Data not available for items 3 and 4.

Topic: Business Ethics and Transparency
Description of the management system for prevention of corruption and bribery throughout the value chain Discussion and Analysis Not applicable EM-MM-510a.1

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

2020 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

Production in countries that have the 20 lowest rankings in Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index Quantitative Metric tonnes (t) saleable EM-MM-510a.2

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

View Data Table

Disclosure Components Year Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Total number and percentage of operations assessed for risks related to corruption 2020 100% 100% 100% 100%
2019 100% 100% 100% 100%
Significant risks related to corruption identified through the risk assessment 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0

On a quarterly basis, the Corporation assesses its operations across all divisions for risks related to corruption and, to date, has not identified any significant risks.

Note: Sherritt does not have production in countries with the 20 lowest rankings in the Corruption Perceptions Index.

Topic: Activity Metrics
(1) Production of metal ores
(2) Finished metal products
Quantitative Metric tonnes (t) saleable EM-MM-000.A

About Sherritt – 2020 Key Indicators

2020 Financial Results

(1) Total number of employees
(2) Percentage contractors
Quantitative Number, Percentage (%) EM-MM-000.B

About Sherritt – 2020 Key Indicators

View Data Table

Disclosure Components Year Canada Cuba2 Other3 Total Sherritt
Full-time
Men 2020 625 2,236 4 2,865
2019 619 2,312 4 2,935
Women 2020 155 214 12 381
2019 148 209 12 369
Unknown 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Part-time
Men 2020 9 0 0 9
2019 11 0 0 11
Women 2020 4 0 0 4
2019 9 0 0 9
Unknown 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Permanent
Men 2020 634 2,236 4 2,874
2019 630 2,312 4 2,946
Women 2020 159 214 12 385
2019 157 209 12 378
Unknown 2020 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0
Temporary1
Men 2020 2 0 2 4
2019 5 0 1 6
Women 2020 4 0 0 4
2019 5 0 0 5
Unknown 2020 22 0 0 22
2019 39 0 0 39

1Temporary employees included consultants or positions currently filled by contractors.

2Includes the office in Havana, Sherritt and GNC employees at the Moa Nickel Site, as well as employees of the entities which make up the OGP businesses (including Energas).

3“Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture and OGP Spain.

Disclosure Components Year Canada Cuba2 Other3 Total Sherritt
Permanent employees (%) 2020 24% 74% 0% 99%
2019 23% 75% 0% 99%
Temporary employees (%)1 2020 1% 0% 0% 1%
2019 1% 0% 0% 1%

1Temporary employees included consultants or positions currently filled by contractors.

2Includes the office in Havana, Sherritt and GNC employees at the Moa Nickel Site, as well as employees of the entities which make up the OGP businesses (including Energas).

3“Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture and OGP Spain.

UNITED NATIONS GLOBAL COMPACT (UNGC)

This report serves as our annual Communication on Progress for the UNGC. Please see www.unglobalcompact.org for more information.

OECD

We have identified in this report where we align with the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Business Conduct and the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas. Please see www.oecd.org and https://www.oecd.org/corporate/mne/mining.htm for more information on these OECD Guidelines.