Five-Year Sustainability Goals

In 2018, Sherritt launched a suite of five-year sustainability goals. These strategic goals incorporate our external commitments and focus on areas that advance and protect our interests and support Operational Excellence. They are intended to complement and supplement – not duplicate – priority efforts already underway. These goals help to shape priorities, long-range planning, and investments in sustainable development across all of Sherritt’s operations. During 2019, we focused on site-level planning and identification of areas where we might establish performance targets. Implementation and target-setting will continue in 2020.

Sustainability Goals Status in 2019

1. Achieve Level A requirements in TSM protocols across all operations.

Goal 1

In 2019, self-assessments against the protocols were completed to understand where each Division scores from C to AAA. Systems were implemented at most sites to improve scores from baseline levels.

2. Strengthen safety culture, behaviour and performance.

Goal 1

Health and safety performance continued to improve in 2019 across the company. Divisions conducted more visible felt leadership interactions in the field and also focused on improving the quality of interactions.

3. Improve environmental management.

Goal 1

Each of our operating sites developed business plans to improve environmental performance, including measures to reduce fugitive emissions.

4. Create community benefit footprints that support local priorities and the SDGs.

Goal 1

In 2019, the Divisions aligned their community investments with the Community Investment Standard, Sherritt’s priority SDGs and the priorities of the regions in which we operate. In 2019, community benefit activities were broadened beyond investment to create a more thorough approach to benefit footprints.

5. Improve diversity at all levels throughout the company.

Goal 1

In 2019, Sherritt launched an internal global framework for diversity and inclusion (D&I), which includes site-level plans for the next five years. D&I committees were established at each of the sites.

6. Be recognized as a “preferred supplier” of responsibly produced products.

Goal 1

In 2019, we updated our Human Rights Policy and Environment, Health, Safety and Sustainability Policy, completed a Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas (CAHRA) assessment of the Moa Joint Venture feed supplies, and developed and implemented a Third-Party Feed Policy.

GRI Index

We have aligned our report with the Global Reporting Initiative’s GRI Standards Guide. See www.globalreporting.org for more information.

General Standard Disclosures
General Standard Disclosures
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Organizational Profile
102-1 Name of the organization

About Sherritt

102-2 Activities, brands, products and services

About Sherritt

Supplying a Sustainable Future

102-3 Location of headquarters

About Sherritt

102-4 Location of operations

About Sherritt – Map and Description

102-5 Ownership and legal form

About Sherritt

102-6 Markets served

About Sherritt – Map and Description

About Sherritt – Divisions and Products

102-7 Scale of the organization

About Sherritt – Key Indicators

2019 Financial Results

102-8 Information on employees and other workers

About Sherritt – Key Indicators

View Data Table

Information on employees and other workers

Disclosure Components Canada Cuba2 Other3 Total Sherritt
Full-time
Men 619 2,312 4 2,935
Women 148 209 12 369
Unknown
Part-time
Men 11 11
Women 9 9
Unknown
Permanent
Men 630 2,312 4 2,946
Women 157 209 12 378
Unknown
Temporary1
Men 5 1 6
Women 5 5
Unknown 39 39

1 Temporary employees included consultants or positions currently filled by contractors.

2 Includes the office in Havana, Sherritt and GNC employees at the Moa Nickel Site, as well as employees of the entities which make up the OGP businesses (including Energas).

3 “Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture and OGP Spain.

102-9 Supply chain

About Sherritt – Our Supply Chain

102-10 Significant changes to the organization and its supply chain

About Sherritt – Divisions and Products

102-11 Precautionary Principle or approach

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility

102-12 External initiatives

Our Approach – Sustainability Framework

Our Approach – Sustainability Goals

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Public Safety

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Site Security – Case Study

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

Operating Ethically – Responsible Production and Supply

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy and Climate Change

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

102-13 Membership of associations

Our Approach – Sustainability Framework

Our Approach – Sustainability Goals

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Public Safety

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Site Security – Case Study

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

Operating Ethically – Responsible Production and Supply

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy and Climate Change

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

Strategy
102-14 Statement from senior decision-maker

CEO Message

102-15 Key impacts, risks and opportunities

CEO Message

2019 Financial Results – Management’s Discussion and Analysis

Ethics and Integrity
102-16 Values, principles, standards and norms of behaviour

Our Approach

Our Approach – Sustainability Framework

Operating Ethically

102-17 Mechanisms for advice and concerns about ethics

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

Management Information Circular – Governance

Governance
102-18 Governance structure

Our Approach – Governance

Management Information Circular – Governance

Stakeholder Engagement
102-40 List of stakeholder groups

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

102-41 Collective bargaining agreements

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Percentage of total employees covered by collective bargaining agreements

Disclosure Components Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate Total Sherritt2
Percentage of total employees covered by collective bargaining agreements 54.3% In Cuba, all organized labour considerations are mandated by the Cuban state, and many systems and tools common in other jurisdictions are not employed there. Not applicable 42.2%

1 Hourly employees as a percentage of total employees at the Fort Site only.

2 Calculated as a percentage of headcount (permanent employees), excluding Cuban local nationals.

102-42 Identifying and selecting stakeholders

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

102-43 Approach to stakeholder engagement

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

102-44 Key topics and concerns raised

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

Reporting Practice
102-45 Entities included in the consolidated financial statements

2019 Financial Results – Management’s Discussion and Analysis

102-46 Defining report content and topic Boundaries

Our Approach – Materiality

About This Report

102-47 List of material topics

Our Approach – Materiality

102-48 Restatements of information

2019 Annual Information Form – Overview of the Business

About This Report

102-49 Changes in reporting

About This Report

102-50 Reporting period

About This Report

102-51 Date of most recent report

About This Report

102-52 Reporting cycle

About This Report

102-53 Contact point for questions regarding the report

About This Report

102-54 Claims of reporting in accordance with the GRI Standards

About This Report

102-55 GRI content index

This table, the GRI Content Index

102-56 External assurance

About This Report

Management Approach Disclosures
Management Approach Disclosures
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Our Approach – Materiality

View Data Table

Explanation of the material topic and its boundary

The following table describes medium and high-priority material issues:
Material Issue Characterization
Country Risks Shifting U.S./Cuba relations
Uncertainties associated with changes in leadership
Project delays from lengthy decision-making processes in Cuba
Economic situation in Cuba
Tailings Tailings management, risks and capacity
Waste rock
Stakeholder topics
Economic Performance Financial performance
Long-term sustainability/viability
Debt management
R&D/innovation
Responsible Sourcing Supply chain traceability and ethical sourcing
Lifecycle impacts
Health and Safety Safety leadership and culture
Workplace occupational health and safety
Fatality prevention
Climate Change Adaptation Adaptation to and mitigation of climate change
Public Safety Emergency and crisis preparedness
Community awareness and preparedness around safety and industrial risks
Community health issues
Security Human rights in private and public security
Employee Relations Employee engagement
Labour rights
Discrimination and harassment
Diversity, Inclusion and Talent Management Recruitment and retention
Diversity and inclusion
Training and development
Water Quantity and access
Effluent quality and quantity (excluding tailings)
Unplanned releases
Energy and GHG Emissions GHG emissions
Energy efficiency
Renewable energy sources
Environmental Liabilities, Closure and Reclamation Progressive reclamation
Legacy issues and liabilities
Long-term management and decommissioning
Financial assurance
Human Rights Respecting human rights
Resettlement
Child and forced labour
Security and human rights
Stakeholder and Indigenous Engagement Community relations
Community response mechanisms/grievance mechanisms
Partnerships
Social licence
Community Development Infrastructure and regional development
Community investment
Capacity building
Local Economic Benefits Local procurement
Local hiring
Economic diversification
Air and Other Emissions Dust and odours
Heavy metals
Noise
Releases (e.g., H2S, SOX, NOX)
103-2 Number of grievances filed, addressed and resolved

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Number of grievances filed, addressed and resolved

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate Total Sherritt
Labour practices
Total number of grievances about labour practices filed through formal grievance mechanisms during the reporting period 18 In Cuba, all organized labour considerations are mandated by the Cuban state, and many systems and tools common in other jurisdictions are not employed there. There were no grievances reported by expatriates or Canada-based employees. 18
Of the identified grievances about labour practices, how many were addressed during the reporting period? 18 18
Of the identified grievances about labour practices, how many were resolved during the reporting period? 7 7
Total number of grievances about labour practices filed prior to the reporting period that were resolved during the reporting period 11 11
Internal
Labour grievances filed through formal grievance mechanisms during the reporting period 18 In Cuba, all organized labour considerations are mandated by the Cuban state, and many systems and tools common in other jurisdictions are not employed there. There were no grievances reported by expatriates or Canada-based employees. 18
Discrimination
Other
External
Environment 1 1
Livelihood/land access
Human rights
Social or community
Other
Economic Performance
Economic Performance
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Material Topic: Economic Performance
103 Management approach disclosures

Our Approach – Materiality

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy and Climate Change

About Sherritt  – Economic Performance

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

201-1 Direct economic value generated and distributed

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

About Sherritt  – Economic Performance

2019 Financial Results – Management’s Discussion and Analysis

View Data Table

Direct Economic Value Generated and Distributed1

(C$ millions, for the year ended December 31, 2019)
Disclosure Components Moa Nickel and Fort Site OGP Corporate and Other Total Sherritt
Revenues 461.00 75.00 10.20 546.20
Costs
Operating costs (costs of sales), excluding depreciation, employee costs and community investments disclosed below 282.67 39.19 7.70 330.30
Employee wages and benefits 105.20 23.30 28.10 156.60
Spending on capital 33.60 30.10 0.10 63.80
Payments to governments2 23.95 3.39 0 27.34
Community investment3, 4 0.434 0.314 0.205 0.95
Total economic value distributed 445.85 96.29 35.90 578.04
Economic value retained or invested (pre-calculated as “Direct economic value generated” less “Economic value distributed”) 15.15 (21.29) (25.70) (31.84)

1 These figures reflect Sherritt’s ownership share in 2019, and reporting for the Moa Joint Venture and Fort Saskatchewan facility are combined to align with other financial disclosures.

2 Includes fines and penalties, where appropriate.

3 Includes cash investments, employee time during working hours, and in-kind valuations.

4 The OGP and Moa Nickel Site valuations for community investment are allocated on a 100% basis to Sherritt.

5 Includes program management costs of the community investment program for direct Sherritt employees only.

Note: There may be some discrepancies between Sherritt’s economic disclosures and the ESTMA filing, due to differences in reporting scope and definitions.

201-2 Financial implications and other risks and opportunities due to climate change

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy and Climate Change

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

201-4 Financial assistance received from government

2019 Financial Results – Overview of the Business

View Data Table

Financial assistance received from government1

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total monetary value of financial assistance received by the organization from governments, by country2 $227,878
(Canada–Alberta Job Grant program)

1 See “Overview of the Business” section in our Annual Report for information on whether, and the extent to which, governments are present in the shareholding structure.

2 These figures are based on a 100% ownership structure.

Material Topic: Market Presence
103 Management approach disclosures

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

202-2 Proportion of senior management hired from the local community

View Data Table

Proportion of senior management hired from the local community at significant locations of operation

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Percentage of senior management1 at significant locations of operation that are hired from the local2 community 79% 90% 71% 100%

1 Definition: Manager (of a group), Director, Controller, Senior Counsel, VP, SVP, CFO, COO, President or CEO.

2 “Local community” refers to national-level hiring at Cuban sites, with special consideration for communities adjacent to our operations. In Fort Saskatchewan, a local is from the province of Alberta, with special consideration for workers who live in the Edmonton Census Metropolitan Area. At Corporate, local refers to the Greater Toronto Area.

Material Topic: Indirect Economic Impacts
103 Management approach disclosures

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

203-1 Infrastructure investments and services supported

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

View Data Table

Infrastructure investments and services supported

Disclosure Components Fort Site Cuba

Extent of development of significant infrastructure investments and services supported

Current or expected positive or negative impacts on communities and local economies

There were no significant investments in infrastructure in 2019.

In Cuba, Sherritt has invested in public infrastructure through its Community Investment Program, including, among other things, street lighting; sanitation and construction equipment; roads; transportation services; and equipment for hospitals, schools and retirement homes.

OGP: Investments provided road repair equipment, submersible water pumps with the control panels and accessories for supporting the potable water distribution, and equipment for the maintenance of green areas and for pipe cleaning. These projects will support government efforts to supply potable water to communities.

203-2 Significant indirect economic impacts

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

SI-1 Economic benefit footprint

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

View Data Table

Economic Benefit Footprint

(C$ millions)
Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site1 OGP1 Total Sherritt
Payments to governments 10.14 27.62 8.50 46.26
Local/national procurement2 167.17 107.91 37.22 312.29
Local salaries, wages and benefits 108.47 53.39 12.73 174.58
Community investment3 0.05 0.32 0.31 0.68
Economic benefit footprint4 285.82 189.24 58.76 533.82

1 Data collected in USD; converted using Bank of Canada’s 2019 average exchange rate of 1.3269.

2 For the Cuba operations, procurement is calculated at the national level. For the Fort Site operations, procurement is calculated at the provincial level (Alberta).

3 Includes cash investments, employee volunteer time during working hours, and in-kind valuations.

4 This calculation includes the sum of the value on local and national suppliers, local salaries and wages, payments to government, and community investment. All reported on a 100% ownership basis.

Material Topic: Procurement Practices
103 Management approach disclosures

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

About Sherritt – Our Supply Chain

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

204-1 Proportion of spending on local suppliers

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

View Data Table

Proportion of spending on local suppliers1

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Percentage of the procurement budget used for significant locations of operation spent on suppliers local1 to that operation 81% 44% 34%

1 “Local suppliers” refers to the national level for Cuba and to Alberta for the Fort Site.

Material Topic: Anti-Corruption
103 Management approach disclosures

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

205-2 Communication and training about anti-corruption policies and procedures

Operating Ethically – Business Conduct

View Data Table

Communication and training about anti-corruption policies and procedures

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Total percentage of employees to whom the organization’s anti-corruption policies and procedures have been communicated and who have been trained on these policies and procedures, broken down by employee category and region1 100%3

100%3

All contracts that empower suppliers to represent Sherritt are to include appropriate contractual safeguards to ensure compliance with our Anti-Corruption Policy. Contractors are not required to do training at this time.

100%3
The total percentage of governance body members who have received training on anti-corruption, broken down by region (training includes being communicated to)2 100% 100% 100% 85.7%

1 Only Sherritt workers in Canada, as well as expatriates, are currently eligible for training. Training for other joint venture partners and workers is not within scope of Sherritt’s policy. We are, however, exploring opportunities to provide a high-level presentation on anti-corruption to Cuban nationals, so they have greater awareness of Canadian and international standards in this evolving area.

2 Those eligible for this training include Sherritt’s Board of Directors and Sherritt employees who sit on boards of subsidiary companies or joint ventures. Non-Sherritt representatives are not within scope of the policy’s training requirements.

3 Sherritt has revised its onboard procedure to include anti-corruption training and certification on the anti-corruption policy for all new salaried employees. This change was put into effect concurrently with the rollout of the updated anti-corruption training module in 2019.

Environmental Performance
Environmental Performance
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Material Topic: Energy
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy and Climate Change

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

302-1 Energy consumption within the organization

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy and Climate Change

View Data Table

Energy consumption within the organization

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total fossil fuel consumption (TJ) 4,362 5,873 28,714
Total electricity consumption (TJ) 573 239 815
Total waste fuel consumption (TJ) 196
Total coal consumption (GJ)
Total fuel consumption from renewable fuel sources (solar, wind, etc.)
Heating consumption
Cooling consumption
Steam consumption (tonnes) 4,383,6661
Electricity sold (TJ) 8,166
Heating sold
Cooling sold
Steam sold (TJ) 76

1 The steam at the Moa Nickel Site is generated by burning fossil fuels and sulphur on site. The steam is consumed internally on site in the process and to generate electricity.

Material Topic: Water
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Water

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

303-1 Water withdrawal by source

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Water

View Data Table

Water withdrawal by source1

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total water withdrawal (m3) 2,370,000 14,882,947 4,906,977
Surface water, including water from wetlands, rivers and lakes (m3) 2,270,000 13,319,368
Saltwater (m3) Not applicable 4,452,956
Groundwater (m3) 62,008
Rainwater collected directly and stored by the organization (m3)
Waste water from another organization (m3) 923
Municipal water supplies or other water utilities (m3) 100,000 1,563,579 195,983

1 Data are collected from meters and some estimates; collection methodologies differ between sites.

303-3 Water recycled and reused

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Water

View Data Table

Water recycled and reused

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total volume of water recycled (m3) 4,873,787 Data not available
Total volume of water recycled and reused as a percentage of total water withdrawal 33.00% 80.56%2
Reclaimed water use (m3)
Process water use (m3) 2,370,000 13,954,936 196,030
Cooling water inflow (m3) 690,0001 966,596 4,006,698

1 The reduction in cooling water diverted in 2019 at the Fort Site may have been partially due to a rental compressor that used less water than the Sherritt-owned compressor that was inoperative for much of 2019.

2 At OGP, total volume of water recycled and reused increased significantly in 2019 because cooling water was not included in the calculation in 2018.

Material Topic: Biodiversity
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

304-1 Operational sites owned, leased, managed in or adjacent to protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

304-2 Significant impacts of activities, products and services on biodiversity

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

304-3 Habitats protected or restored

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

View Data Table

Habitats protected or restored

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total size of protected areas (ha) Not applicable. There are no regulatory, licence or other requirements to protect or restore habitats.
Total size of restored areas (ha) Rehabilitated land data is provided in table MM1 below.
MM1 Amount of land disturbed or rehabilitated

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

View Data Table

Amount of land (owned or leased, and managed for production activities or extractive use) disturbed or rehabilitated

Disclosure Components Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site2 OGP Total Sherritt
Total amount of land disturbed and not yet rehabilitated (ha) 131 832.443 53.97 1,017.41
Total amount of land newly disturbed within the reporting period (ha) 56.70 56.70
Total amount of land newly rehabilitated within the reporting period to the agreed end use (ha) 20.54 Not applicable 20.54
Total land rehabilitated since start of project – estimate (ha) Not applicable 750.042 Not applicable 750.04

1 2019 data of the total amount of land disturbed was sourced from a biodiversity assessment that calculated the “Principal Disturbance Area” (PDA) of the Fort Site. Land disturbance at the Fort Site has remained relatively unchanged since 1954, but this area now includes agricultural land owned by Sherritt.

2 Data reported for the Moa Nickel Site represents land disturbance that occurred from 1994 onwards – or the years that the Moa Joint Venture between Sherritt and the Cuban state has been in place. The data do not reflect any mining activity at the site that pre-dates the joint venture.

3 Data reported for the Moa Nickel Site for 2019 were revised to include disturbed and rehabilitated tailings dam areas.

MM2 Sites requiring biodiversity management plans

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

View Data Table

Sites requiring biodiversity management plans

Disclosure Components Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site2 OGP1
Total number of operations requiring biodiversity management plans (BMP) 1 Not applicable Not applicable/under development
Number of total operations that have been assessed under the criteria as in need of a BMP 1 Not applicable Not applicable
Percentage of total operations that have been assessed under the criteria as in need of a BMP 100% Not applicable Not applicable
Of the number of operations in need of a BMP, the number that have a BMP in place and operational Not applicable Not applicable
Of the number of operations in need of a BMP, the percentage that have a BMP in place and operational Not applicable Not applicable

1 No regulatory obligations requiring a BMP; however, since Sherritt is implementing TSM, these sites are developing site-level BMPs.

2 The previous BMP reported at the Moa Nickel Site was linked to Humboldt Park requirements, which were completed in 2017. Sherritt management is advocating to the Moa Joint Venture management for the development of a new BMP that aligns with Sherritt’s Biodiversity Management Standard and with TSM.

Material Topic: Emissions
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy and Climate Change

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy and Climate Change

View Data Table

Direct (scope 1) ghg emissions

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Total Sherritt
Scope 1 emissions (kt CO2e) 335 5562 1,402 2,293
Sources included in the GHG emissions calculation CO2, CH4, N2O CO2, CH4 CO2
Other site-specific indicators 17 kt of credits purchased (> 5% of total emissions)1

1 All of the credits are accredited by the Alberta Carbon Registry.

2 In 2018, the Scope 1 value of 606 kt included the Scope 2 component; therefore, the real value should have been 554 kt.

305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy and Climate Change

View Data Table

Energy indirect (scope 2) ghg emissions

Disclosure Components Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site1 OGP Total Sherritt
Scope 2 emissions (kt CO2e) 59 60 119

1 Purchased grid electricity.

305-7 Nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulphur oxides (SOx) and other significant air emissions

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Energy and Climate Change

View Data Table

Nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides and other significant air emissions

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Air emissions – NOx (tonnes) 1,264 1,7221 6,065
Air emissions – SOx (tonnes) 87 12,211 26,208
Air emissions – TPM (tonnes) 80 Not reported Not applicable
Air emissions – Persistent organic pollutants (tonnes) Not applicable Not applicable
Air emissions – Volatile organic compounds (tonnes) 10 Not applicable Not reported
Air emissions – Hazardous air pollutants (tonnes) 11.1 Not applicable Not reported
Source or emission factors US EPA Air Emissions Factors US EPA Air Emissions Factors Measured by Gamma2

1 NOx increased at the Moa Nickel Site due to an increase in the amount of fuel used.

2 OGP works with Gamma, operating on behalf of the Cuban environmental regulator CITMA, on matters of environmental monitoring.

Material Topic: Effluents and Waste
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Waste

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

306-2 Waste by type and disposal method

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Waste

View Data Table

Waste by Type and Disposal Method

Disclosure Components Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total waste (tonnes) 2,744 16,837 8,9642
Waste recycled – includes recyclables sent off site (batteries, plastics, electronics, etc.)1 (tonnes) 99 692 225
Waste sent to landfills (tonnes) 2,682 13,746 3,408 m3
Hazardous waste (tonnes) 1,049 2,4443 73

1 Decrease in waste generated in 2019 was due largely to lower capital spending and austerity measures.

2 Waste increase at OGP was due to the replacement of three large condensate tanks, and to the decommissioning of some sections of the Varadero facility and removal of equipment.

3 In 2018, an increase took place in the Moa Nickel Site due to work in the Sulphur Storage Area, which was necessary to extract all the contaminated soil. In 2019, this work did not take place and consequently hazardous waste decreased.

Recycled Waste Breakdown1
Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Batteries (tonnes) 107.02
Plastics (tonnes) 0.17
Paper 38.00 tonnes 180.00 kg
Electronics (tonnes) 0.42
Used oil (tonnes) 49.00 44.67 144.792
Tires (units) 328.00
Fluorescent bulbs 0.05 tonnes + 54 units

1 Waste recycled – same units of items collected were added up. Methodology and reporting expected constant improvement.

2 Litres of used oil were converted to tonnes using a conversion factor of 1,100 L/t.

306-3 Significant spills

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Biodiversity and Land

View Data Table

Significant spills

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Total Sherritt
Total number of recorded significant spills1 (#)
Total volume of recorded significant spills (m3)

1 Significant spill – spill that is included in the organization’s financial statements, for example due to resulting liabilities, or is recorded as a spill by the organization.

MM3 Total amounts of overburden, rock, tailings and sludge and their associated risks

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

View Data Table

Total amounts of overburden, rock, tailings and sludge and their associated risks

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Total Sherritt
Total amounts of waste rock (tonnes) Not applicable 253,449 Not applicable 253,449
Total amounts of overburden (tonnes) Not applicable 2,432,948 Not applicable 2,432,948
Total amounts of liquid tailings and sludge (tonnes) Not applicable 12,652,052 Not applicable 12,652,052
Material Topic: Environmental Compliance
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Environmental Liabilities, Closure and Reclamation

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

307-1 Non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Tailings Management

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Water

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Environmental Liabilities, Closure and Reclamation

View Data Table

Non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Significant fines and non-monetary sanctions in terms of:
Total monetary value of significant fines (millions)
Total number of non-monetary sanctions (#)
Cases brought through dispute resolution mechanisms – fines (millions)
Cases brought through dispute resolution mechanisms – non-monetary sanctions (#)
SI-2 High-severity environmental incidents

View Data Table

High-severity environmental incidents

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Number of high-severity environmental incidents1 (#)
Comments

1 A “high-severity environmental incident” is an incident that results in a significant or lasting effect to the environment as follows:

  • Unlicensed release of >10,000 litres of hydrocarbons or toxic solution to water or ground.
  • Unlicensed air emission that causes a significant off-site impact, including evacuation, damage, use impairment, illness, or other impact to neighbouring facilities or the public.
  • The upset or shutdown of a community wastewater treatment facility or contamination of a drinking water supply.
  • Significant wildlife fatalities (such as a fish or amphibian kill).
  • Unplanned closure or restriction of public transportation routes.
  • Any act triggering a subsequent investigation and/or order by a regulatory agency, other than routine follow-up.
SI-3 Reportable environmental incidents

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Reportable environmental incidents

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Total Sherritt
Number of reportable environmental incidents1 (#) 1 1 2
Comments Air quality–related incident. Technical non-compliance with our licence with no lasting impacts. Water quality–related incident of low severity with no lasting impacts. No employees or community members were harmed while these incidents occurred or while they were addressed.

1 A “reportable environmental incident” is a permit or licence exceedance or non-compliance for air, water or ground that requires reporting to a regulatory agency. This includes administrative non-compliance incidents.

Social Performance: Labour Practices
Social Performance: Labour Practices
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Material Topic: Employment
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

401-1 New employee hires and employee turnover

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

New employee hires and employee turnover

Disclosure Components Canada (Fort Site and Corporate offices) Cuba (Moa Nickel and OGP)2 Other3
Male Female Male Female Male Female
Employee new hires (%) 77.90% 22.10% 100% 0% 78.70% 21.30%
Ratio: entry-level wage compared to local minimum wage1 241% 181% Not available Not available Not available Not available
Workforce by employment level (total number as at year-end):
Hourly employees 338 13 Not available Not available Not available Not available
Support (grade 12)4 47 73 Not available Not available Not available Not available
Professional/management 233 69 Not available Not available Not available Not available
Executive 12 2 Not available Not available Not available Not available

1 This ratio is for hourly employees (in Alberta), who make up approximately 42.2% of our workforce. This does not include contractors. The Alberta minimum wage of $15 was used.

2 In Cuba, employment is managed by a state-owned agency; Sherritt does not have these data.

3 “Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture, and OGP Spain.

4 Grade 12 represents administrative and support workers who are overtime eligible at Sherritt.

Disclosure Components Canada Cuba Other2 Total Sherritt
Employee turnover (%)
Men 16.35% 22.73% 25.00% 17.11%
Women 22.93% 21.30%
Voluntary turnover (%)1
Men 13.17% 6.82% 25.00% 13.13%
Women 17.83% 16.57%
Involuntary turnover (%)
Men 3.17% 15.91% 3.98%
Women 5.10% 4.73%

1 Voluntary turnover includes short-term employment contracts.

2 “Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture, and OGP Spain.

401-3 Parental leave

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Parental leave

Disclosure Components Canada Cuba Other2 Total Sherritt
Number of employees who took parental leave1
Men 5 5
Women 5 5
Number of employees who returned to work after parental leave ended
Men 5 5
Women 5 5
Return-to-work and retention rate of employees who took parental leave (%)
Men 100% 100%
Women 100% 100%

1 Parental leave includes maternity leave and parental leave. Does not include paid new parental leave (employees who are not otherwise eligible for maternity leave, including employees who are fathers or partners who become parents).

2 “Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture, and OGP Spain.

Material Topic: Labour/Management Relations
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

402-1 Minimum notice periods regarding operational changes

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Minimum notice periods regarding operational changes

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Minimum number of weeks’ notice typically provided to employees and their elected representatives prior to the implementation of significant operational changes that could substantially affect them 2 weeks (not specified in collective agreement) 2 months (standard requirement of state-run employment agency) and additional guidance provided by Cuba’s Ministry of Labour and Social Security 2 months (standard requirement of state-run employment agency) and additional guidance provided by Cuba’s Ministry of Labour and Social Security
MM4 Number of strikes and lock-outs exceeding one week’s duration, by country

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Number of strikes and lock-outs exceeding one week’s duration, by country

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Total number of strikes and lock-outs that exceeded one week’s duration during the reporting period, by country
Material Topic: Occupational Health and Safety
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Health and Safety

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Public Safety

403-2 Types of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days and absenteeism, and total number of work-related fatalities

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Health and Safety

View Data Table

Types of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days and absenteeism, and total number of work-related fatalities1

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate Total Sherritt
O&G Power
Number of work-related fatalities
Employees
Contractors and other workers
Total
Number of lost time incidents
Employees 1 2 3
Contractors and other workers
Total 1 2 3
Lost time incident (LTI) index2
Employees 0.14 0.1 0.09
Contractors and other workers
Total 0.12 0.08 0.07
Number of total recordable incidents
Employees 7 7 2 16
Contractors and other workers 1 2 1 4
Total 7 8 2 3 20
Total recordable incident (TRI) index3
Employees 1.01 0.34 0.60 0.47
Contractors and other workers 0.23 1.66 1.47 0.50
Total 0.87 0.32 0.47 0.74 0.47

1 All sites are applying the U.S. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) general recording criteria. Reference Standard 29 CFR section 1904.7. The Sherritt standard is aligned with this system of rules. We did not track occupational disease rates in 2019, and we currently do not track these data by gender.

2 LTI index = # LTI * 200,000/SUM (exposure hours for the year).

3 Minor (first-aid level) injuries are not included in the TRI index.

“Employees” include: Sherritt and GNC employees seconded to the Moa Joint Venture (100% basis) and employees of the entities through which the Corporation carries on its Oil & Gas business, and employees of Energas.

“Contractors and other workers” include: contractors and other workers not included in the “Employees” category.

SI-4 Emergency preparedness

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Public Safety

View Data Table

Emergency Preparedness

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP Corporate
Sites with crisis communication plans Y Y Y Y
Sites with crisis/emergency preparedness and response plans Y Y Y Y
Material Topic: Diversity and Equal Opportunity
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

405-1 Diversity of governance bodies and employees

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Diversity of governance bodies and employees

Disclosure Components Total Sherritt
Percentage of individuals within the organization’s governance bodies (board members)
Male 71%
Female 29%
Under 30 years old
30–50 years old 14.3%
Over 50 years old 85.7%
Minority groups1 Not reported

1 Board members that self-identify as Aboriginal, as persons with a disability, or as a visible minority as defined in Canada’s Employment Equity Act.

Disclosure Components1 Canada2 Cuba
Percentage of employees
Male 80% 92%
Female 20% 8%

1 Includes Sherritt employees and Cuban local national employees.

2 Includes permanent employees for the Fort Site, OGP Calgary and the Corporate office.

Disclosure Components1, 2 Metals (Fort Site only)3 OGP4 Corporate5 Commercial and Technologies
Percentage of employees
Under 30 years old 14% 3% 6% 7%
30–50 years old 46% 47% 61% 55%
Over 50 years old 40% 50% 33% 38%

1 Includes Sherritt employees and Cuban local national employees.

2 Sherritt does not currently track percentage of minority groups for its divisions; however, local employment is the majority at all of Sherritt’s sites globally.

3 Excludes the Moa Nickel Site.

4 Does not include Spain, consultants or local nationals.

5 Does not include consultants or local nationals.

405-2 Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men

View Data Table

Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men

Disclosure Components Canada
(Fort Site and Corporate offices)
Cuba
(Moa Nickel and OGP)2
Other3
Average Basic Salary Average Total Direct Compensation Average Basic Salary Average Total Direct Compensation Average Basic Salary Average Total Direct Compensation
Male : Female Male : Female Male : Female Male : Female Male : Female Male : Female
Ratio of basic salary and total direct compensation by employment level1:
Hourly employees 1:0.9 1:0.9 Not available Not available Not available Not available
Support (grade 12)4 1:1 1:1 Not available Not available Not available Not available
Professional/management 1:0.9 1:0.9 Not available Not available Not available Not available
Executive 1:1 1:1 Not available Not available Not available Not available

1 For each group of salaried employees, the weighted average job grade in that category was analyzed to determine the Total Direct Compensation ratio.

2 In Cuba, employment is managed by a state-owned agency; Sherritt does not have these data.

3 “Other” includes our Bahamian marketing office, which services the Moa Joint Venture, and OGP Spain.

4 Grade 12 represents administrative and support workers who are overtime eligible at Sherritt.

Social Performance: Human Rights
Social Performance: Human Rights
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Material Topic: Non-Discrimination
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

406-1 Incidents of discrimination and corrective actions taken

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Incidents of discrimination and corrective actions taken

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Number of incidents of discrimination on grounds of race, colour, sex, religion, political opinion, national extraction, or social origin as defined by the ILO, or other Incidents of discrimination in Cuba are handled by the state employment agency that provides Sherritt’s businesses and joint ventures on the island-nation with workers. The employment agency will require the involvement of Sherritt and/or its joint venture partners in discrimination cases, as appropriate. Such involvement has occurred in previous years.
Material Topic: Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

407-1 Operations and suppliers in which the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at risk

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Employee Relations

View Data Table

Operations and suppliers in which the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at risk

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Measures taken by the organization in the reporting period intended to support rights to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining Unionized employees are represented by Unifor Local 530A. In April 2016, a three-year agreement came into effect. In 2019, the agreement was extended for a one-year period (until March 2020), and in late 2019 the union provided notice to bargain in 2020. All Cuban employees hired through national agency.
Material Topic: Child Labour
103 Management approach disclosures

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

408-1 Operations and suppliers at significant risk for incidents of child labour

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

View Data Table

Operations and suppliers at significant risk for incidents of child labour

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Measures taken by the organization in the reporting period intended to contribute to the effective abolition of child labour In Canada, the use of child labour is controlled under labour laws. In 2015, Cuba ratified the ILO’s Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention, which calls for the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including slavery, trafficking, the use of children in armed conflict, the use of a child for prostitution, pornography and illicit activities (such as drug trafficking) as well as in hazardous work. Cuban legislation prohibits child labour and establishes 17 years old as the minimum age of employment.
Material Topic: Security Practices
103 Management approach disclosures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Site Security

410-1 Security personnel trained in human rights policies or procedures

Providing a Safe and Rewarding Workplace – Site Security

View Data Table

Security personnel trained in human rights policies or procedures

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Percentage of security personnel who have received formal training in the organization’s human rights policies or specific procedures and their application to security 100% Security is provided by the Cuban state and Sherritt has no authority over their training.
Material Topic: Human Rights Assessment
103 Management approach disclosures

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

412-1 Operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or impact assessments

Operating Ethically – Human Rights

View Data Table

Operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or impact assessments

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Total number of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or human rights impact assessments in country 1
Percentage of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or human rights impact assessments in country 100%
Social Performance: Society
Social Performance: Society
GRI Indicator Description Location SDG
Material Topic: Local Communities
103 Management approach disclosures

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Community Development

413-1 Operations with local community engagement, impact assessments and development programs

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

View Data Table

Operations with local community engagement, impact assessments and development programs

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Percentage of operations with
Implemented local community engagement, impact assessments and development programs
Social impact assessments, including gender impact assessments, based on participatory processes
Environmental impact assessments and ongoing monitoring
Public disclosure of results of environmental and social impact assessments
Local community development programs based on local communities’ needs
Stakeholder engagement plans based on stakeholder mapping
Broad-based local community consultation committees and processes that include vulnerable groups
Works councils, occupational health and safety committees and other employee representation bodies to deal with impacts
Formal local community grievance processes In Cuba, there is a state-run system where citizens can file complaints against an entity, organization or enterprise whose activities they feel are adversely affecting their well-being.
Implemented local community engagement impact assessments and development programs
SI-5 Number of community meetings

Engaging Stakeholders and Benefitting Communities – Stakeholder Engagement

View Data Table

Number of community meetings

Disclosure Components Fort Site Moa Nickel Site OGP
Number of community meetings 22 7 14
Material Topic: Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining
MM8 Number and percentage of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining takes place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the action taken to manage and mitigate these risks

View Data Table

Number and percentage of company operating sites where artisanal and small-scale mining takes place on, or adjacent to, the site; the associated risks and the action taken to manage and mitigate these risks

Disclosure Components Cuba
Where ASM takes place on or adjacent to company sites, or presents risks to the company’s operations

To the best of management’s knowledge, artisanal and small-scale mining does not exist in Cuba.

Material Topic: Resettlement
MM9 Sites where resettlements took place, the number of households resettled in each, and how their livelihoods were affected in the process

View Data Table

Sites where resettlements took place, the number of households resettled in each, and how their livelihoods were affected in the process

Disclosure Components Moa Nickel Site
Sites where resettlement of a community occurred
Number of households involved in any resettlement program
Number of individuals involved in any resettlement program
Consultation processes and measures put in place to re-establish the affected community and mitigate any impacts of relocation, and the outcomes in terms of livelihoods, including sustainable land use No resettlement occurred in 2019.
Significant disputes related to resettlement and the processes employed to resolve outstanding issues
Material Topic: Closure Planning
103 Management approach disclosures

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Environmental Liabilities, Closure and Reclamation

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

MM10 Number and percentage of operations with closure plans

Demonstrating Environmental Responsibility – Environmental Liabilities, Closure and Reclamation

View Data Table

Number and percentage of operations with closure plans

Disclosure Components Units Fort Site1 Moa Nickel Site OGP
Operations within the division that have closure plans % 100 100 OGP sites revert to the Cuban state upon closure.
# 1 1 OGP sites revert to the Cuban state upon closure.

1 As part of the provincial operating approval, a closure plan outlining approaches on reclamation and/or remediation is required. In 2017, the Fort Site developed an appropriate plan for the site. This plan was included in the Operating Approval renewal application submitted in 2018.

Material Topic: Oil & Gas
OG1 Volume and type of estimated proven reserves and production

2019 Annual Information Form – Description of the Business

OG4 Number and percentage of significant operating sites in which biodiversity risk has been assessed and monitored

View Data Table

Number and percentage of significant operating sites in which biodiversity risk has been assessed and monitored

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
Criteria used to define priority sites for biodiversity conservation and where significant biodiversity risk requires Biodiversity Action Plans to be in place As regulated
Biodiversity Action Plan methodology (e.g., definitions, baseline assessments, management plans, protected areas, endemic species’ habitats, endangered species) As regulated
Number and percentage of significant operating sites where biodiversity risk has been assessed 5 sites currently
100%
Number and percentage of significant operating sites exposed to significant biodiversity risk
Number and percentage of significant operating sites exposed to significant biodiversity risk in which Biodiversity Action Plans have been implemented and monitored
OG5 Volume and disposal of formation or produced water

View Data Table

Volume and disposal of formation or produced water

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
Total volume of produced water 446,258 m3
Volume and percentage of produced water by disposal method (including reused, recycled, re-injected) 435,007 m3 injected – 2,340 m3 evaporation pit
Strategies and criteria for disposal and treatment, and standards used for quality of produced water discharged, including hydrocarbon and salinity Produced water is metered and injected back into formation zones. Slight variance between produced and disposal water volumes as the disposal meters are +/-5% accurate.

Note: Volume of hydrocarbon discharged within produced water is not measured at this time.

OG6 Volume of flared and vented hydrocarbon

View Data Table

Volume of flared and vented hydrocarbon

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
Volume of flared hydrocarbon (Mm3) 661
Volume of continuously flared hydrocarbon broken down by country (Mm3) 312
Volume of vented hydrocarbon
Volume of continuously vented hydrocarbon broken down by country

1 The volume of flared hydrocarbon increased because of the sulphur unit outage in Varadero. When H2S is flared, additional gas has to be mixed with it to maintain ground-level dispersion.

2 The reported volume of continuously flared hydrocarbon decreased because of changes in production.

OG7 Amount of drilling waste and strategies for treatment and disposal

View Data Table

Amount of drilling waste (drill mud and cuttings) and strategies for treatment and disposal

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
Total amount of drill mud and cuttings (in tonnes) produced using non-aqueous drilling fluid Cupet – 1,228 m3
OG – 260 m3
Total amount of drill mud and cuttings produced (in tonnes) using aqueous drilling fluid, by disposal method 1,488 m3
Treatment, disposal and minimization strategies Evaporation pond for liquids.
Solids are reclaimed, treated and land farmed.
OG11 Number of sites that have been decommissioned and sites that are in the process of being decommissioned

View Data Table

Number of sites that have been decommissioned and sites that are in the process of being decommissioned

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
Number of sites (broken down into offshore and onshore) and total land area of sites (onshore only) for both active and inactive sites No sites were decommissioned in 2019.
Criteria for defining inactive sites End of contract
Percentage of active sites that have decommissioning plans in place Assets are transferred to state partner at end of contract.
Decommissioning approach (e.g., plans for land owners, labour transition, finance, community infrastructure, environment remediation and government sign-off, post-decommissioning monitoring and aftercare) Assets are transferred to state partner at end of contract.
Complaints on outstanding local community issues or government notices on decommissioning Not applicable
OG13 Number of process safety events, by business activity

View Data Table

Number of process safety events, by business activity

Disclosure Components Oil & Gas
Number of Tier 1 process safety events with narrative per API RP 754 definitions and reported per business activity (refining, upstream, etc.) None
Number of Tier 2 process safety events with narrative per API RP 754 definitions and reported per business activity (refining, upstream, etc.) None
Report on asset integrity monitoring and maintenance program, including progress against actions identified Energas – 100% of PM program completed.
OG – Yearly UT program in place to test wall thickness.

United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) Communication of Progress

Please see www.unglobalcompact.org for more information on the UNGC.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

Please see www.oecd.org for more information on the OECD.